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T E L L E R C O U N T Y, C O L O R A D OA publication of

December 17, 2014VOLUME 53 | ISSUE 50 | 7 5 ¢

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PIKES PEAK COURIER(USPS 654-460)

OFFICE: 1200 E. Highway 24Woodland Park, CO 80863

PHONE: 719-687-3006

A legal newspaper of general circulation in Teller County, Colorado, the Pikes Peak Courier is published weekly on Wednesday by Colorado Community Media, 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO and additional mailing o� ces.

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Service Guide Inside

WP Planning set to tackle code amendments Commissioners look over priorities for 2015 By Norma Engelberg Contributing writer

Getting a jump on 2015, at its Dec. 11 regular meeting the Woodland Park Planning Com-mission recommended approval of an amendment to the city code that requires a 25-foot setback for outside display at vehicle sales businesses.

As part of his experience as a city intern, Cy Abbott, a high school student from Colorado Springs Christian School, has worked on the amendment since a request from Bad Rock Automo-tive for a conditional use permit to create a used-vehicle lot.

“Auto sales are a permitted use in service commercial zones and conditional uses in other commercial zones,” Abbott said. “The city code requires 25-foot setbacks for these lots but doesn’t enforce it. This setback require-ment is obsolete and a detriment to business.”

He also pointed out that other Colorado cities, both large and small, don’t have such display setbacks.

Woodland Park Planning Di-rector Sally Riley explained that this setback requirement dates to before the city created its cur-rent zoning matrix in 1996. With the city’s design standards requir-ing a 15-foot street yard between parking lots and paved roads, the planning department thought the 25-foot setback was unnecessary.

Commissioner Marti Propes, who eventually cast the sole no vote on this ordinance, com-plained that a motorcycle/ATV sales business in the city’s down-town displays its vehicles a lot closer to the street than 15 feet and that it looks like a junk yard to her. Other commissioners dis-

agreed with her assessment and Riley explained that this sales lot already existed before 1996 and is “legal nonconforming” or “grand-fathered.”

Commissioner Charles Schro-eder asked the city to pay special attention to lots that might ob-struct views at intersections. Riley said these view triangles are very important and will be protected.

This amendment ordinance goes to Woodland Park City Coun-cil for fi rst reading on Jan 15 and public hearing on Feb. 5. Abbott said he plans to make the presen-tation at the public hearing even though his internship will be over by then.

Riley reported that, in Octo-ber, the building department conducted 12 plan reviews and 179 inspections and issued 31 permits.

Commission Chair Jon DeVaux said the Jan. 8 planning commis-sion meeting will likely draw a crowd. It will look at a request by Charis Bible College to amend its planned unit development per-mit to add 700 seats to the audi-torium and a 1,000-space parking garage.

With regular business fi nished, Riley started a code amendment work session. She then listed the planning department’s accom-plishments, including setting

tiered water and wastewater fees, standardizing most public post-ing timelines and creating both the domestic fowl ordinance and accessory dwelling unit codes.

Amendments she suggested the commissioners work on in 2015 include adding a variance process to the a domestic fowl ordinance, prohibiting trash cans being left out overnight to give the city’s Bear Aware Campaign some teeth, adding accessory structures to commercial zoning codes and several amendments to the sign codes.

All potential amendments were prioritized by urgency and diffi culty but no matter where sign amendments landed on the urgency scale, all were listed as most diffi cult on the diffi culty scale. Riley said anything the city does with signs requires input from a lot of people.

One amendment would have required public notices when developers request permits for “speculative grading.” Riley ex-plained that grading is usually part of a development plan but sometimes developers want to grade properties that don’t have such plans to make them more marketable. There is no provi-sion in the code that requires neighbors to be notifi ed when such a request comes to the plan-ning department. Commission-ers went a step farther and said why not just prohibit speculative grading altogether.

With the commissioners’ stamp of approval the planning department will start working on amendments as future case load permits.

New Planning Commissioner Gerald Penland, center, attended his � rst planning commission meeting and work session on Dec. 11. Also at the table are Planning Commissioner Charles Schroeder and City Planner Lisa Parnell. Photo by Norma Engelberg

Commissioners approve lean budget

By Pat Hill [emailprotected]

With the failure of Amendment 68 in the November election, the 2015 budget for Teller County refl ects an invisible sigh of relief for the taxpayers as well as the fi nance offi ce.

If voters had approved the amendment, there was the distinct possibility that video lot-tery terminals would offer gamblers another type of betting other than in Cripple Creek - Pueblo, for instance.

“A statewide ballot issue (Amendment 68) that would have affected our local sales and gaming taxes was soundly defeated in Novem-ber, making it unnecessary for us to reduce proposed 2015 revenues for expenses for adop-tion,” states the budget message.

With that good news added to a lean bal-ance, Teller County commissioners approved the 2015 budget Dec. 11. A jump from the past two years, nonetheless, the budget of $26,809,633 refl ects a conservative approach by commissioners Marc Dettenrieder, Dave Paul and Norm Steen. Of the total, $1,059, 981 signals revenue gained from grants.

The budget includes placing a high prior-ity on building contingency funds for future wildfi re concerns through the allocation of property-tax revenues, which are 38 percent of all revenue collected. However, revenue from property taxes shows a 3.1 percent declines, a reduction of $7,657,586.

The budget contains a measure of hope for the Sheriff’s offi ce as next year’s allocation in-cludes funding to begin preliminary rehabilita-tion of the Harris building in Divide.

There won’t be much hiring next year, as the budget eliminates 12 unfi lled positions, in order to preserve the county’s pay-for-perfor-mance compensation plan to current employ-

ees.In offering benefi ts to the employees, the

county is complying with the current require-ments of the Affordable Care Act, states the message.

While ending its agreement with the city of Woodland Park to provide building permits, the county made up the shortfall by not fi lling vacancies in that department.

Vicki Caldwell, budget offi cer, presented the document to the commissioners. The budget is available on the county’s website at www.co.teller.co.us.

Also that day, county treasurer Bob Camp-bell reported that 400 properties sold during the tax-lien sales for a total of $198,000.

To accommodate the holiday, the commis-sioners meet off-schedule, on Dec. 18.

Denise Sloan, unit lead case manager, was honored by Teller County commissioners Dec. 11 for her 15 years with the Depart-ment of Social Services. Congratulating Sloan is commission chair Dave Paul; at right is Pam Elliot, economic assistance program supervisor for DSS. Photo by Pat Hill

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Lake George Charter School boards the Polar Express Children entertained audience with songs from � lm By N. W. Oliver Contributing writer

On Dec. 6, parents of Lake George Char-ter School students and LGCS staff packed into the gymnasium for a magical journey into the world of the classic storybook, “The Polar Express,” written by Chris Van Allsburg. Seating for an audience of more than 300 was insuffi cient to house the crowd fully, as more than 20 visitors stood in the wings during the children’s perfor-mance.

Accompanying the reading of the book by second-grade teacher, Leisha Lanz, the students sang Christmas songs as well as songs from the “Polar Express” movie. Among the Yule-time titles were, “Jingle Bells,” “The Polar Express,” “Hot Choco-late,” “North Pole,” “Santa Claus is Com-ing to Town,” “When Christmas Comes to Town” and “Just Believe.” All of the cos-tumes for the production were the chil-dren’s own pajamas.

The production was directed by Marky-da VenRooy, the music teacher hired at the beginning of the school year. VenRooy graduated with a master’s degree in educa-tion from Southwestern Assemblies of God University in 2010. She did her student teaching at Lake George Charter School during 2010 and has been substitute teach-ing for the last four years before offi cially joining the Lake George Charter School staff in August 2014.

The lighting and set were “the best they have ever been” according to Lake George local, Sandi Sumner. The set was built and paid for by VenRooy and her family. The lighting was done by Rex Oliver, LGCS’s building maintenance and technology co-ordinator.

The production was sponsored by Foxworth Galbraith, Sherwin Williams in Woodland Park, Do it Best Hardware, and Pat’s Carpentry. Refreshments after the production were donated by the parents and families of the students.

Above, the Lake George Charter School 2014 Christmas production surrounded the reading of Chris Van Alls-burg’s “The Polar Express” by Leisha Lanz, second-grade teacher. At left, The closing act of the LGCS production of “The Polar Express” was the singing and signing, in sign language of “We Wish You a Merry Christmas.” Photos by N.W. Oliver

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Fires, bullets, basketballs, plays, lightning strikesMiners’ Union Hall somewhat dis�gured, but still in the ringBy Rob [emailprotected]

In July, after a being struck by lightning, the historic Miners’ Union Hall in Victor was nearly destroyed in a fire that started around 2 p.m. July 26. Fire crews from Vic-tor, Cripple Creek, Four Mile, Divide and Northeast Teller County Fire Protection District helped battle the blaze this sum-mer.

Barbara McMillan owns the build-ing and began restoring it once again in October. Built in 1899, after the dev-astating fire that destroyed much of the town of Victor, the union hall is a critical piece of the town’s history. On Monday, June 6, 1904, the Union Hall first found it’s place in history when two men were killed, three others were gravely wounded, in the lot below the Gold Coin shaft house across from the Union Hall.

A fight broke out that afternoon as Clar-ence Hamlin, of the Mine Owner’s Associa-tion called for chasing “these W.F.M scoun-drels out of the district,” after the bombing of the Independence train platform killing 13 non-union miners that morning, and injuring at least a dozen more. What be-gan as fist fight, escalated into gunfire and some of the fire seemed to have come from the windows of the Union Hall.

“The militiamen surrounded the Union Hall. Sheriff Ed Bell and Postmaster Dan-ny Sullivan entered the club and told the W.F.M. members to come out,” wrote Mar-shall Sprague, in “Money Mountain.”

They refused, he reported and “The militiamen aimed their rifles and poured volley after volley into the rooms, wound-ing four men. The rest surrendered and were led off by the militia. Berserk civil-ians rushed into Union Hall, wrecked the walls, smashed furniture, ripped curtains, and destroyed membership ledgers. After-wards, this gang and other gangs roamed the gold camp for W.FM. members and wrecked every union hall and union store. About two hundred men were impris-oned.”

Altogether 225 union members were loaded on trains and deported under guard to Kansas and New Mexico locations.

Because of the dynamiting of the Inde-pendence, the W.F.M. became extremely unpopular, and mine owners were able to force them out of the district, according to

Sprague.Years later, the Union Hall served a dif-

ferent, yet noteworthy, purpose.Margaret Whitehill Geddes, in her

book Gold Camp Indian Summer, recalls her husband Kenneth being named the new high school principal of Victor in the late1920s. Kenneth and Margaret later became publishers of the Cripple Creek Times-Record, a merger of the Cripple Creek Times and the Victor Record news-papers and an ancestor of the Pikes Peak Courier.

“He was not only the new principal, but we were to have the apartment in Miners’ Union building which had been recently remodeled (roughly) to be used as a gym-nasium,” wrote Geddes.

“Oh that apartment! The second floor of the building was reached by a long stair-case with swinging doors halfway up. On the right at the top were tow doors, one leading to the kitchen, one to the dining room. In front of these were the bedroom and living room. Glass partitions divided the dining room and living room, and the kitchen and the bedroom. Each room was square and there were full length windows in the two front rooms. The windows had been replaced but the marks of the bul-lets of the miners’ strike in 1904 were still showing in the bricks and plaster around them,” Geddes wrote.

“Outside the apartment a hall led to the big auditorium, sometimes gym, with a stage at one end. The auditorium was heated two stoves at the far end. Two boys came after school to make the fires. Soon after I’d hear the clump clump of feet on those steep stairs as the basketball boys came up for practice. (Not until later was there a football team, and basketball went on for most of the school year),” Geddes said.

“Besides the games, at least twice a year there were plays staged in the auditorium,” she noted.

“The plays produced were not the cheap no-royalty shows, but productions that had been successes on the Broadway stage, probably some time before, but le-gitimate hits, and they were popular and drew good crowds. The Victor Opera house sadly had been torn down about two years before and people said they appreciated having something to take its place, even if it was only a high school play with local young people taking the parts.”

After the lightning strike and the fire this year, McMillan expressed dis-may and sorrow, citing not only the potential loss but the lack of funds.

“I’m out of money,” she said in July. In October, however, McMillan submitted a plan to the city to start the cleanup and remodel.

The plan includes repairing holes in the wall, removing the flashing as well as the unstable and damaged bricks. “They’re go-

ing to monitor that to make sure the walls aren’t moving,” said Deb Downs, Victor’s city manager.

Soon after McMillan submitted the plan, the contractor, Daniel Halbrook Ma-sonry, pulled permits from the city and started work Oct 3.

Bullet holes from ‘the dark time’ can still be viewed in the facade. Photo by Rob Carrigan

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from Woodland Park School District

Artist: Violet Wang, 1st grade, Gateway Elementary SchoolArtist: Violet Wang, 1st grade, Gateway Elementary SchoolArtist: Violet Wang, 1st grade, Gateway Elementary School

Pikes Peak Community College o� ers classes in WP For the Courier

Pikes Peak Community College is part-nering with Woodland Park School District and the Pikes Peak Community Founda-tion to offer college courses in Teller Coun-ty. The collaboration began recently with limited courses at Woodland Park High

School, with the ultimate goal of growing the offerings to better serve the western portion of PPCC’s service area.

According to Jed Bowman, superin-tendent of Woodland Park Schools, ef-forts to offer classes in Teller County have been ongoing. “We tried a few different approaches in the past, but nothing had enough momentum to sustain,” Bowman

said in a press release.However, last year, Eric Cefus, direc-

tor of philanthropic services with PPCF, as well as the parent of a child in the district, connected Dr. Lance Bolton, president of PPCC, and Bowman, with the foundation’s Aspen Valley Ranch.

The ranch open space provides innova-tive educational experiences that include workshops and events focused on arts, music, culture and sustainable living skills.

“This effort allows students interested in outdoor career fi elds the ability to fully utilize fi rst-class learning environments,” Bolton said. “And it gives them an edge for successful career opportunities.”

PPCC offers instruction for several out-door leadership and recreation technology courses at the high school, with fi eld trips to the 180-acre ranch and surrounding ar-eas. Additional courses will be offered in the spring and summer.

“Now we are offering a longterm rela-tionship for our high school students, col-lege students and, hopefully, develop into evening classes to meet our community needs,” Bowman said.

The ongoing partnership between WPSD and PPCC is not completely new. They already work together in offering concurrent enrollment at the high school

to include English and Spanish classes. According to Linda Murray, the district’s

assistant superintendent, students earn high school as well as college credit that can be transferable to colleges and univer-sities throughout Colorado.

“Our staff teaches the courses after being approved as an adjunct professor through PPCC,” she said. “We use PPCC textbooks and syllabus to teach at no cost to the student. It’s a win/win program!”

Students from the high school also par-ticipate in the college’s Area Vocational Program, which provides career training in key areas such as health, criminal justice, welding and machining.

Another opportunity is Ascent, which is run through the state. This is when a WPHS student, who completes 12 college credits by the end of the senior year and meets college entrance requirements, is consid-ered a fi fth-year senior but is a full-time student at PPCC.

Students pay for their own fees and textbooks while WPSD covers tuition for a full year at PPCC. “We are so excited to have these partnerships with PPCC,” Mur-ray said. “It is a wonderful opportunity for our students and our community. We hope to offer more in the future.”

Pikes Peak Community College is partnering with Woodland Park School District and the Pikes Peak Community Foundation to o� er college courses in Teller County. The use of the 200-acre Aspen Valley Ranch is part of the plan. Photos by Rob Carrigan

Class might use any portion of the Aspen Valley Ranch.

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‘Tis the Season for Giving!Donate Stuff and Create Jobs.

Call 635.4483 or visit DiscoverMyGoodwill.org for holiday hours and locations.

DiscoverGoodwillSouthern & Western Colorado

EDITOR’S NOTE: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. Send listings to [emailprotected]. No attachments, please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.

THROUGH DECEMBER

CITIZEN FIREFIGHTERS The Ute Pass Historical Society & Pikes Peak Museum present “Citizen Fire�ghters of Ute Pass,” a new display at the Woodland Park Public Library through December. Residents of Ute Pass live on the borders of the Pike National Forest and within communities threatened by drought and wild�res. These areas are referred to as urban/wildland interface areas. We are fortunate to have citizen �re-�ghters equipped and trained to protect our beloved property, lovely surroundings, and our lives. This exhibit recognizes the early development of volunteer �re departments in Ute Pass, and celebrates the tradition of service they have provided for decades. The display is located on the top �oor of the library, just outside the Colorado Room.

THROUGH DECEMBER

ART SHOW “Vanishing Vistas,” an art show to bene�t youth art programs, is open through December at the Eichman Gallery in Park State Bank. The show will feature original paintings by national recognized artist Kenneth Shanika. For information, contact the Kenneth W. Shanika Studio, 900 Tamarac Parkway, Woodland Park. Call 303-647-1085 or email

[emailprotected]. Go to www.ShanikaFineArts.com.

THROUGH MARCH 8

SPIN CLASSES Mountain Top Cycling Club will host 20 spin class sessions on Monday and Friday nights from Monday, Dec. 1, to March 8 at Woodland Park Middle School, in the com-mons area. Doors unlock at 5:40 p.m., with pedals turning at 6 p.m. A one-time fee of $25 will be charged, for building use and insurance. Participants must provide their own bikes and trainer equipment. David Kreigshauser will instruct the class in a 60- to 75-minute work out to his videos from Seek Out Cycling. Times and dates will be posted on the club website under the calendar tab as there will be some days there will not be class. Visit www.mountaintopcyclingclub.comor call Debbie 719-689-3435.

DEC. 18

MRS. CLAUS Cathy Kelsey will present Mrs. Claus at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 18, at the Florissant Public Library, 334 Circle Drive. Call Polly at 719-748-3939. Presentations are free; no registration required.

DEC. 20

SUPPORT GROUP The Woodland Park Parkinson Support Group will have its Christmas potluck brunch at 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 20, at the Woodland Park Library. Paper plates, cups and plastic ware will be provided. Parkinsonians and caregivers are welcome. Co�ee also will be provided.

DEC. 20

PANCAKE BREAKFAST Fuel up for your last Saturday of shopping with hot, �u�y pancakes, scrambled eggs, link sausage, biscuits & gravy, juice, co�ee or tea. The monthly pancake breakfast is served from 7:30-10:30 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 20, at the Woodland Park Senior Center, 312 N. Center St., Woodland Park. Cost is $6; kids 6 and younger eat free. Proceeds support activities and programs at the senior center. Go to http://www.wpseniorcenter.com.

DEC. 20-23

SANTA AND dinos Santa Claus will visit the Dinosaur Resource Center, 201 S. Fairview St., Woodland Park, from 1-3 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 20, to Tuesday, Dec. 23. Children can made an ornament for the center’s Christmas tree and themselves. Program included with cost of admission.

DEC. 21

OPEN HOUSE Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center, Divide, will have an open house from 9-10 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 21. Meet and greet Keyni the ambassador wolf, take a wolf tour and enjoy breakfast burritos. Call 719-687-9742 for reservations. Cost is $25 for adults; kids 12 and younger are admitted free.

DEC. 23

KIDS ORNAMENT day Kids can make pine cone ornaments from noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 23, at the Woodland Park

Public Library. Event is free; no registration required. Call Julie at 719-687-9281 ext. 113.

DEC. 29

CHILDREN AGES 12 and younger will receive free admission on kids’ free day Tuesday, Dec. 29 at the Dinosaur Resource Center, 201 S. Fairview St., Woodland Park. The center is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cool Science will be at the center from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. for a Super Cold Science Show where visitors can make their own cup of ice cream and see what happens when ordinary objects are exposed to extremely cold temperatures. Shows are at noon and 2 p.m. Up to 2 children will be admitted free with regular paid adult admission. Go to www.rmdrc.com.

JAN. 1

NEW YEAR hike Eleven Mile State Park plans its third First Day Hike from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 1. Meet in the Coyote Ridge parking lot, 4229 C.R. 92, Lake George. Park naturalist Beth Dodd leads the hike, which will focus on the survival challenges faced by the plants and animals of the park during the cold season. Bring warm boots, cloves or mittens, and head gear as desired. Water or a thermos of warm liquid also might be bene�cial. Registration requested but not required. Hike will be about an hour to an hour and a half. Con-tact 719-748-3401 or go to http://cpw.state.co.us/placestogo/Parks/ElevenMile.

THINGS TO DO

EDITOR’S NOTE: To add or update a club listing, e-mail [emailprotected].

POLITICAL

TELLER COUNTY Democratic Party (TellerDems)invites interested persons to attend its 2014 informational and educational programs, as well as community events. For details about the TellerDems calendar of activities, call Mrs. Ellen Haase, 719-687-1813.

TELLER COUNTY Republicans meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Pikes Peak Comyomunity Center in Divide next to the Conoco. Come and help set the course for conservative thinking and direction in Teller County, Colorado, and the nation. Additional information at http://www.teller-gop.org.

TRANSPORTATION’S LOCAL Coordinating Council of Teller County meets at 9 a.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Aspen Mine Center in Cripple Creek. This meeting is open to the public and all are welcome to attend.

PROFESSIONAL

DIVIDE CHAMBER of Commerce. Contact president Lisa Lee at 719-686-7587 for meeting dates and times.

COMPUTER CLASSES. The Woodland Park Public Library o�ers computer basics, Internet basics, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Digital Photo Management classes. Some classes have prerequisites, and registration is required for all. Call 719-687-9281, ext. 106 to register.

PIKES PEAK Workforce Center o�ers monthly classes on topics such as resume writ-ing, interview skills and more. Workshops are free and take place at the main o�ce, 1675 Garden of the Gods Road, Suite 1107, Colorado Springs. Call 719-667-3730 or go to www.ppwfc.org.

TELLER BUSINESS Builders meets at 7 a.m. Mondays at the Hungry Bear, 111 E. Midland Ave., in Woodland Park. The group helps local businesses through coopera-tive marketing, professional education and trusted relationships. Call Gail Wingerd at 719-686-1076 or send e-mail to [emailprotected] or Mike Hazelwood at 719-473-5008

TELLER NETWORKING Team meet from 7:45-8:45 a.m. Thursdays at Denny’s Restaurant in Woodland Park. TNT is a local businesses owners networking group working to pass leads and help each others’ businesses grow. Join us to learn more or call Vickie at 719-748-1274.

RECREATION

ART CLASSES are o�ered year-round at Shanika Studio for ages 13 and older. Classes focus on traditional oil painting skills, but also include other artistic mediums including drawing, watercolor, acrylic and mixed media. Classes are two and a half hours and are o�ered Mondays, Thursdays or Saturdays. Days may change to meet students’ needs. Classes are taught by professional artist Kenneth Shanika. Contact 303-647-1085, [emailprotected] or www.ShanikaFineArts.com.

CHRISTIAN YOGA is o�ered at 5 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. Sundays at Corner Street, 500 E. Midland Ave. in Woodland Park. Mindfullness-centered practice aimed at relaxation, focus, gentle movement.Contact Chrissy Bensen, with bStill Integrative Wellness LLC at 719-510-2743 (www.bStillyoga.com) before attending for the �rst time to reserve a spot; after that, just drop in. Cost is $7 per class.

EXERCISE CLASSES o�ered for through Community Partnership Family Resource Center’s Healthy Living Programs in various locations throughout Teller County. Visit www.cpteller.org for a calendar of classes, or email Kathy at [emailprotected] for more information.

FLORISSANT GRANGE Hall is available for events including weddings, birthdays, anniversaries and memorials. The Florissant Grange Hall, also known as the Old School House in Florissant, is a historic building built in 1887 and 1888. School started in the school in 1889 and continued through 1960, which creates an interest-ing historic atmosphere. The Old School House sits on 2-plus acres and weather permitting the grounds can be used as well. Call 719-748-5004 and leave a message to arrange a time to visit the Grange Hall and reserve this space for your event.

EVERY THURSDAY all year the Florissant Grange Hall (The Old School House) is open from 6-9 pm for the Jammers Music and Pot Luck. This is a happening place to be on Thursday evenings. Sometimes we have more musicians than people and sometimes we have more people than the hall can hold, but no matter what, we have fun and great music and fabulous food. All musicians are welcome to join in the jam session and if you are not a musician, come for the social evening out. Call 719-748-0358.

YOGA AT Shining Mountain Studio with Nancy Stannard. Safe, fun and empowering; accessible to all �tness levels. Ongoing classes are 5:30 p.m. Wednesday (intermedi-ate); 9 a.m. Thursday (gentle beginner); and 10 a.m. Saturday (intermediate). Con-tact Nancy at gentleyoga4healing.com before �rst class and see gentleyoga4healing.com for more information.

GET IN shape with a parks and recreation �tness membership. The center o�ers

Paramount and Nautilus equipment and free weights. Schedule a personalized �tness orientation and have an individual workout program designed for your �tness needs. Individuals ages 16 and older are welcome to become �tness members. Minors require signed parental permission. Corporate memberships are available. Call 719-689-3514.

FRONT RANGE Fencing Club. Learn to fence class for children and adults. Meets at Discovery Canyon Campus. Visit http://frontrangefencing.tripod.com/ Advanced competitive lessons available too.

HEALTHIER LIVING Colorado, Diabetes Self-Management Workshop. Learn the skills needed to manage your diabetes.Teller County Public Health and Community Partnership Family Resource Center o�er six-week classes to help you with the challenges of living with this ongoinghealth condition.Participants learn how to control their blood glucose, prevent complications, and cope with the stress of having a chronic health condition. Call Teller County Public Health at 719-687-6416 or visit www.cpteller.org or www.co.teller.co.us/PublicHealth for information and a list of classes in your neighborhood.Suggested donation $35.

JAM NIGHT. The Grange Hall is open from 6-9 p.m. every Thursday for the Jammers music and potluck. This is a great night and the place to be on Thursdays. The music is always di�erent depending on who and how many musicians show up. We always have fun, good food and dancing. All musicians are welcome to join in the jam session. If you are not a musician, come for a social evening out to meet other com-munity members. Call 719-748-0358.

KARATE PLUS meets at 6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at Woodland Park Community Church and at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Lake George Bible Church. The class includes Japanese karate and jujitsu, Okinawan weapons, padded sparring and Judo throws. Self-defense is also taught. The program is Bible-based. Black belt instruction. KP has been in the Ute Pass area for more than 16 years. Low rates. Ages 5 through adult. Two free lessons. For more information call Ken at 719-687-1436. KP is nonpro�t and non-denominational.

THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club Youth Program for Earth Science Educa-tion, Peblepups, meets from 6-6:45 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Lake George Community Center on Hwy 24 on the east side of Lake George. The program is free to students age 8-18. Each session discusses a separate aspect of Earth science or mineral collecting. Warm weather will allow �eld trips on weekends. Further information from Steve Veatch 719-748-5010 or John Rakowski 719-748-3861 or at LGGMClub.org.

THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club meets the second Saturday of every month at the Community Center, Lake George. Meetings begin at 10 a.m. until May, when it changes to 9 a.m. to accommodate a �eld trip in conjunction with the regular meet-ing. There is always a program or �eld trip.

MOTHER BEAR Self-Defense o�ers Krav Maga classes from 9-10:30 a.m. Saturdays and by appointment on Thursdays on the second �oor of the Corner Dance Studio in Woodland Park. Mother Bear also o�ers women’s self-defense classes for groups of three or more. Contact Wendy at 719-323-7949 for information.

THE MOUNTAIN Top Cycling club holds monthly meetings for bicyclist of all types and skill levels. The club meets at di�erent locations on the �rst Tuesday of the month. Membership fee is $25 for individual and $40 for family. We have guest

speakers, presentations and door prizes. The meeting is from 7-8 p.m. Social time at 6:30 p.m. Visit www.mountaintopcyclingclub.com or write us Mountain Top Cycling Club P.O.Box 843 Woodland Park CO 80866. For more information, call Debbie at 719-687-2489.

PIKES PEAK Plein Air Painters o�ers year-round artistic activities, painting on loca-tions, social activities pertaining to the visual arts and art shows. The group is open to anyone interested in learning to paint or to improve their painting skills. Contact Kenneth Shanika at 303-647-1085 or [emailprotected], or go to www.PikesPeakPleinAirPainters.com

TAI CHI is o�ered for free at 9 a.m. Mondays at the Florissant Public Library. Call 719-748-3549 or Margaret McKinney, 719-748-5141

TAI CHI is o�ered every Wednesday at Florissant/Four Mile Fire Department. Call Meridel Gatterman, 719-689-5861.

TAI CHI is o�ered from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Thursdays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs resource room. Call Cheryl Koc, 719-687-2633 or Judy Ross at 719-686-9122.

TAI CHI is o�ered from 9-10 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs community room. Call Penny Brandt, 719-687-1848 or Judy Ross at 719-686-9122.

TAI CHI, Sun Style 73 Forms, is o�ered from 10-11 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs community room. Call Cheryl Koc, 719-687-2633.

TELLER COUNTY Shooting Society,an organization establishing a new gun range in Teller County, meets the second Saturday of every other month at the Divide Community Center and the Elks Club in Victor. The club has 52 members and expects to grow substantially once ground breaks in the spring. All of the political hurdles are completed and all of the necessary applications have all been approved.Go to www.tcss-co.org.

THERAPEUTIC YOGA-BASED stress-reduction classes o�ered from 5-6 p.m. Sundays in Woodland Park.Welcoming, fun, and a�ordable.Cost is $7 per class. See www.bStillcounseling.com or contact Chrissy Bensen, MA-MFT, 719-510-2743 for details.

TELLER COUNTY 4-H Shooting Sports Club meets the �rst Sunday of each month at the Pikes Peak Community Club (PPCC) in Divide at 4 p.m. 4-H projects/disciplines covered by the club: .22 and Air Ri�e, Archery, Shotgun, and Air Pistol. For more information about the club meetings or project/discipline practices, contact Bob Tyler, 719-748-1335 or [emailprotected]. For 4-H enrollment contact Mark Platten at 719-686-7961.

THURSDAY NIGHT Beginners Book Study meets from 7-8 p.m. Thursdays at Wood-land Park Community Church. Email [emailprotected] for information.

UTE PASS Historical Society o�ers free tours (donations gratefully accepted) of His-tory Park every second Saturday of the month from June through September. History Park is open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come tour our old buildings, and learn some of the history of Ute Pass. We also o�er a walking tour of Woodland Park which meets

AREA CLUBS

Clubs continues on Page 14

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6 Pikes Peak Courier December 17, 2014

6

Jazzercise of Woodland Park

Come see our Newly Remodeled Facility106 E. Village Terrace (Hwy. 24, in the Paradox Brewery Building)

719-686-0092Jazzercise of Woodland ParkJazzercise of Woodland Park

MUSIC. DANCE. FITNESS.Try it for FREE and pay nothing

until January 1.Come join the fun!

Check out the class schedule at jazzercise.com/FindaClass.

Community says fondgoodbye to Cindy Morse By Pat Hill [emailprotected]

More than 200 people gave Cindy Morse a fond, but raucous, farewell Dec. 10 at the Ute Pass Cultural Center. Morse, who has served the city of Woodland Park for 33 years, is retiring as the city clerk at the end of the month.

Morse, who typically eschews such events, was hugged and lauded in a long reception line.

However, Morse rallied to the party and showed photos of her time on earth, beginning with babyhood and following up with pictures of highlights during her years as the city’s clerk.

City manager David Buttery served as master of ceremonies and sparked hoops and hollers from members of groups Morse has affected, such as Teller Senior Coalition, the city’s elected offi cials and employees.

To sweeten the occasion, Mayor Neil Levy proclaimed that Dec. 31 would be “Cindy Morse Day” in Woodland Park.

The Swiss Chalet catered the occasion.

Chris Frandina, former clerk/treasurer in Green Mountain Falls, was among 200 friends and family who came to say goodbye to Cindy Morse. Frandina is � anked by a representa-tive of CIRSA, the municipal insurance company.

Cindy Morse talked to everybody, at least 200 people, who came to bid farewell to the city’s clerk who is retiring this month. Talking to Morse is Dave Paul, left, and Je� Baldwin.

The city of Woodland Park threw a party for city clerk, Cindy Morse, who is retiring Dec. 31 after 33 years with the city. Photos by Pat Hill

Co� man bucks GOP on immigration vote Congressman says action by Republicans will mislead Americans By Vic Vela [emailprotected]

Republican Congressman Mike Coff-man bucked his own party during a Dec. 4 House vote on a measure that seeks to undo recent changes to U.S. immigration policy that were put in place by President Obama.

Meanwhile, Congressman Cory Gard-

ner, Colorado’s Republican senator-elect, voted for the effort, which is largely meant to serve as a message to the president, who surely would veto the measure.

The Democrat-controlled Senate is not expected to take up the resolution.

Coffman was one of only seven House Republicans to vote against House Resolu-tion 5759, which passed the chamber by a vote of 219-197.

Coffman, who represents the state’s 6th Congressional District, is coming off an impressive re-election victory over former state House Speaker Andrew Romanoff.

Coffman ran a campaign where he touted the need for immigration reform. His district, which was re-mapped in 2012,

includes a large number of immigrants, in-cluding those who are Latino.

The congressman voted against the resolution, even though he said through a statement that Obama’s recent executive action on immigration is unconstitutional.

“I voted against H.R. 5759 because, although I strongly believe that it is un-constitutional to have immigration policy made through executive orders and with-out the consent of Congress, this legisla-tion will only mislead the American people into believing that we are taking care of the problem when the only way to ad-dress President Obama’s overreach is ei-ther through the U.S. Supreme Court or through the appropriations process.”

Immigration reform also was an issue in Gardner’s race against Democratic Sen. Mark Udall, whom Gardner edged in last month’s election.

Gardner, who represents the state’s 4th Congressional District, also explained his vote through an emailed statement, say-ing that while the resolution does nothing to solve immigration problems, Obama’s actions “circumvented Congress and as-serted power he previously said he doesn’t have.”

“Today the House voted on a bill to condemn the president’s circumvention of Congress. But neither the president’s ac-

tions nor today’s legislation will solve the real problem at hand: our broken immi-gration system.”

On Nov. 20, Obama announced that he would take steps to protect millions of un-documented immigrants from the threat of deportation by allowing them to stay in the country temporarily.

The president said his actions will allow federal agents to prioritize deportations that target threats to public safety and not hard-working, law-abiding immigrants who contribute to society.

The president’s moves also will add more border resources and will make it easier for high-skilled immigrant workers, college graduates and entrepreneurs to stay in the country.

Obama’s moves were hailed by immi-grant advocates, and public polling has shown that his actions are receiving over-whelming support among Latinos — a demographic that Republicans have strug-gled to attract, especially over the last sev-eral years.

Coffman was the only member of Colo-rado’s congressional delegation to break party ranks on the vote. Doug Lamborn and Scott Tipton joined Gardner in vot-ing for the resolution. Democrats Diana DeGette, Jared Polis and Ed Perlmutter all voted against the measure.

AT YOUR SERVICE:

For assistance in

placing obituaries or to set up a new funeral home account, contact our customer

support specialist at [emailprotected] or call 303-566-4100

or visit our website ColoradoCommunityMedia.com and click on the

obituaries tab.

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DVD gives viewers look at lives of academy cadets‘A Year In �e Blue’ shows rigors of boot-camp style trainingSta� report

The new DVD “A Year In The Blue; Inside the Air Force Academy,” is now available for sale at numerous outlets.

The documentary film was three years in the making and is an unprecedented be-hind the scenes look at the men and wom-en who make up the Air Force Academy.

Filmmakers were granted access to the academy for this latest documentary.

The film follows the lives of freshman cadets who are challenged to make it through their grueling first year, to the up-perclassmen cadet officers charged with leading them. It is an insider’s peak into life inside the academy.

The film portrays the heartbreaks and triumphs of balancing boot-camp style military training, a rigorous four-year col-lege education, mandatory athletics and flying and parachuting. The cameras fol-low the cadets from dorms to boot camp, the airfield, Falcon Stadium, West Point and Alaska and in the skies for stunning aerial photography.

“This DVD makes a great stocking stuffer for students who may be consider-ing the Air Force Academy, former cadets and their families, military veterans and anyone who has ever been curious about what life is like on the inside,” said the film’s co-director Alan Hayden. “People are amazed when they see what challenges lie ahead for these young people when they enter the academy.”

DVDs of the first ever feature length documentary of the U.S. Air Force Acad-emy is available now through ayearinthe-blue.com, the Association of Graduates, the Air Force Academy Visitors Center and

online through major retailers.The 105-minute documentary was pro-

duced by WOH Productions LLC in asso-ciation with Postmodern Company, David Emrich, producer, and Edward Done, co-

director. It was made possible with a sponsor-

ship from Boeing.For more information or to place an or-

der, visit ayearintheblue.com.

Members of the Air Force Academy’s Wings of Blue Parachute team maneuver their canopies toward successful landings in the Academy’s cadet area. The team will perform at the upcoming national championships in Florirda. Photo courtesy of the Air Force Academy

LET US CELEBRATE WITH YOUHave a wedding, anniversary, engagement, birth and special occasion coming up? Share it! Colorado Community Media invites you to place an announcement to share your news. Please call 303-566-4100 for package and pricing information. Deadline is 10 a.m. Tuesdays the week preceding the announcement.

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8 Pikes Peak Courier December 17, 2014

8-Opinion

OPINIONY O U R S & O U R S

Lessons learned, same as it ever was When the fi rst editions of USA Today hit

the streets in the fall of 1982, I was taking my fi rst college journalism classes. Many of my professors in J-school made fun of it — initially.Al Neuharth, chairman of Gannett at the time, and the father of “Nations’s paper,” recalled a less-than-warm reception.“Most media critics brushed us off quickly. Linda Ellerbee, then a popular late-night news commentator on NBC, paraphrased our “non-smudge” ink promotion with this sarcastic comment: “USA TODAY doesn’t rub off on your hands or your mind.” Many critics compared us to McDonald’s, as the “fast food of journalism.”Neuharth, however was vindicated and the paper, by its 30th birthday, had the largest print circulation in the country and second largest total circulation at 1,817,446 (1,701,777 print and 115,669 digi-tal). it trailed “The Wall Street Journal’s”” 2,118,315 (1,566,027 print and 552,288 digital) at the time.

As Neuharth noted in 2012, “The fact is more people across the USA and around the world want more news and informa-tion today than ever before. They also want it in different ways — in print, on the air, on the Web. As long as news providers give it to them when they want it, where they want it and how they want it, they not only will survive but also thrive. That includes newspapers, if they also adapt to new ways of distributing the news, which they gener-ally gather more professionally than any

other media.”Always, there is the struggle for rele-

vance. In the San Juans of Colorado (where I grew up) the arrival of a newspaper meant the town had also arrived. Creede, for example, in the 1890s started out with four newspapers. Telluride had as many six papers operating in the heyday. And locally, there was as many as seven differ-ent papers practicing the craft in Cripple Creek District, at least two of them as daily publications. But, just as today, nothing is guaranteed.

“Rico, for instance, during the fi rst twenty years of its life had ten different newspapers, only one lasting longer than six years, “ notes John L. Ninneman and Duane Smith in their recent book “San Juan Bonanza.”

Mining areas, though desperate for service provided by a newspaper, often struggled for the technology to catch up. Boomtown Fairbanks in Alaska, with about 1,000 people, and only 387 houses either fi nished or in the process of construction,

six saloons, and no churches in 1903, had one of the most expensive newspapers in the world at the time, at $5 per copy for “The Fairbanks Miner.”

The editorial policy of The Fairbanks Miner was straightforward, wrote Terrance Cole in his book “E.T. Barnnette” about the founder of Fairbanks.

“Published occasionally at Fairbanks, Alaska, by a stampeder who is waiting for the snow to melt and the ice to go out in the rivers... If you don’t like our style, fl y your kite and produce your 30-30,” wrote Judge James Wickersham, who started the “Miner” to raise cash to fi nance a trip to climb Mt. McKinley. Wickersham and a public stenographer named G. Carlton Woodward, who had brought a small Em-pire green-ribboned typewriter with him from Dawson in Yukon territory, typed the entire issue. They made seven copies, and three were put in the saloons and one was mailed to Senator Charles Fairbanks. Only one issue of “The Fairbanks Miner” was published because the ice went out, just as they were going to press.

The landscape for newspaper survival outside the mining districts was not much better.

The fi rst newspaper in Monument was established A.T. Blachly in 1878, and called the “Mentor.” It only lasted until 1880, but the Monument Journal picked up the torch briefl y. By 1885, another paper, called

Fi� een fun facts about ”It’s A Wonderful Life” If you have read my columns over the

past couple of years you know I have men-tioned that my favorite movie of all time is “It’s A Wonderful Life.”

The classic 1946 fi lm is a holiday staple for many people. My son and I have amassed a near-complete Bedford Falls Christmas village that we leave up year round. We have a bell of an angel on our Christmas tree with the inscription “Nobody is a failure who has friends.” A hardcover photo book of the movie sits on our coffee table.

I know that many of you also hold the Frank Capra fi lm near and dear to your heart. The story is one that many of us can relate to.

“Each man’s life touches so many other lives, and when he isn’t around he leaves an awful hole, doesn’t he?” says the angel Clarence to George Bailey.

The moral premise of the story is differ-ent for each one of us. For me it is that self-ish hoarding leads to a miserable life, but sacrifi cial giving leads to a wonderful life.

If you do an Internet search, you will fi nd hundreds of fun and interesting facts

about the fi lm. I have compiled a list 15 of the some of my favorites from IMBD and other sites.

The fi lm was produced by Liberty Films, an independent motion picture produc-tion company founded by Capra and Samuel J. Briskin in April 1945. Liberty pro-duced only two fi lms, It’s a Wonderful Life, originally released by RKO Radio Pictures, and the fi lm version of the hit play “State of the Union” (1948), originally released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

It’s a Wonderful Life was made at a cost of $3.7 million. It was technically released on Dec. 20, 1946, so that it could be consid-ered for the Academy Awards, but went

into general release on Jan. 7, 1947. The common thought is that it was embraced by both critics and the public alike im-mediately after its release. But moviego-ers weren’t all that thrilled with the fi lm. Likewise, the picture received generally mixed reviews. It did garner fi ve Academy Award nominations, but made $3.3 million (a loss of $400,000) during its initial run. It’s a Wonderful Life placed 26th in box offi ce revenue, one spot ahead of another Christ-mas classic, “Miracle on 34th Street.”

It’s A Wonderful Life was ranked as the No. 1 Most Powerful Movie of All Time by the American Film Institute in 2006.

Bedford falls is a fi ctional city in New York, but the elaborate set was made and fi lmed in southern California. The set for Bedford Falls was constructed in two months and was one of the longest sets that had ever been made for an American movie. It covered four acres of the RKO’s Encino Ranch. It included 75 stores and buildings, a main street, factory district and a large residential and slum area.

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WE’RE IN THIS TOGETHER

1200 E. Highway 24Woodland Park, CO 80863(enter o� of Paradise Circle)

Mailing address:PO Box 340, Woodland Park, CO 80866

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The Courier features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Courier.

Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone.

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GERARD HEALEY

ROB CARRIGAN

STEPHANIE DYKE

PAT HILL

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RON MITCHELL

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ERIN ADDENBROOKE

AUDREY BROOKS

SCOTT ANDREWS

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Pikes Peak Courier 9 December 17, 2014

9

OBITUARIES

Katherine Marie Wolff was born on September 4, 1923 in Fond du Lac, Wis-consin. She was the 2nd of 6 children born to George and Bernice Powers. Kath-erine and her family moved to Madison, WI in 1928 where she later met and fell in love with James A. Wolff, her “Jimmie”. Mind you, she was the only one who James willingly let her call him that!

Katherine passed away on Nov. 27, 2014 in Holyoke, CO. She was proceeded in death by her parents, her brothers George and Charles, her sister Betty, her infant son Mark Andrew, her husband of nearly 70 years, James, her daughter in law Barbara, and her youngest son, Michael Paul. Katherine leaves behind 2 sisters Audrey Matteson and Geri Tholo and 5 living children, Katherine L. Wolff, Mary Pierce & husband Roger, James A. Wolff II, Lynn Ball & husband Billy Joe, and Susan Wolff. Katherine also leaves 9 grandchildren, 15 great grandchildren and a host of extended family and friends.

As a career Army wife, Katherine was adept at making friends & adjust-ing to all sorts of cultural changes. During their years together, Katherine & James were stationed all over the USA and did tours in Okinawa, Japan and Munich, Germany. James’s service also took him away to serve in WWII and the Korean Conflict. That left Katherine to “hold down the fort”.

In 1955, the family moved as James was stationed at Ft. Carson in Colorado Springs, CO. They fell in love with the area and purchased their own little piece of heaven in Wood-land Park. It became their anchor and when James retired in 1965, they moved there permanently. Pikes Peak became Katherine’s mountain and she never tired of the view of that ma-jestic peak from her front windows.

Katherine’s first love was her family and she was and amazing homemaker. She loved entertaining and greeted everyone with a warm smile. Her love of reading was obvious to all who knew her. It was passed on to her children and many others over the years. Katherine was in-strumental in starting the library system in Woodland Park. She spent countless years as an unpaid vol-unteer until funding was available to hire a librarian. Katherine also volunteered twice a week at the local elementary schools in the reading program. She was active with the Voice of Democracy program for as long as I can remember.

Katherine also loved gardening, baking, the game of Scrabble; she was a budding Thespian, a seamstress, excellent dancer, and a master at the game of jacks. Volun-teer should have been her middle name. She and James helped set up the Food Pantry in Woodland Park; she was the Presi-dent of the Ladies VFW

Auxiliary Post 6051 for 25 years. She helped at Our Lady of the Woods Catholic Church from the time it was originally built until she left 5 years ago. You could always find her help-ing with catechism classes, RCIA program, Bingo card checker, serving coffee & rolls; at the Altar and Rosary meetings….the list is endless.

Katherine will be sorely missed. She was like the energizer bunny. She did not complain, she just picked herself up and got with the program. Kath-erine and her youngest, Michael, loved a good joke. Their blue eyes always twinkled when they got to the punch line and I think they laughed harder than their audience. St. Peter should be hearing several new ones now and I hope he is chuckling.

Rosary will be held for Katherine on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 at 7 pm at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Holyoke, CO.

Funeral Mass will be at 11 am on Thursday, January 8, 2015 at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, 541 S. Interocean, Holyoke, CO.

A luncheon will follow in the basem*nt of the church and all are welcome.

Interment will be held at the Hillside Cemetery, Julesburg, CO.

In lieu of flowers or plants, Memorials may be made to the St. Patrick’s building fund in Kather-ine’s honor.

Gerk Funeral Home is entrusted with the ar-rangements.

WOLFF Katherine Marie Wolff Sept. 4, 1923 – Nov. 27, 2014

Did you know...

Colorado Community Media was created to connect you to 22 community papers with boundless opportunity and rewards.

the El Paso County Register was going and survived until 1889. In 1890, another publication, the “Monument Recorder” lasted less than a year, but about the same time, the “Monument Messenger” arrived and lasted until 1911. A replacement didn’t hit the scene again until “Preacher Sam,” who lived near Monument Lake created the “Lake View Press” in the 1950s. The “Columbine Herald” appeared on the scene about the same time. Then in the 1960s, our forerunner, the Monument Palmer Lake News, which later included the Woodmoor News, was first published by George Kobolt of Castle Rock. This year, we will celebrate our 50th year.

Critics of print in general, and our paper specifically, brush us off as relic of some not-to-distant past. They talk of a bygone era where the country editor might

lead varied life, with useful knowledge in every subject, good debater, good listener, and instructive talker; generous to the limit of his ability.

“He had been from devil up to press-man in a printing office,” wrote M.V. Atwood in “The Country Newspaper” describing this individual.

“He could sweep floors; clean cuspi-dors, set type; make up forms; run job press, cylinder, stitcher, binder, or engine; could repair them all if they got out of order; could write news, or editorial; cor-rect proof; and sell papers on the street. He learned all he knew in the office. The mod-ern efficiency and ‘specializing’ methods have eliminated this relic of olden times, but there is just as much to be learned in the printing office, as there was then,” wrote Atwood in 1923.

Don’t count us out in the innovation arena, and be careful of, and perhaps show respect for, the idea that there is just as much to be learned in the local paper today— as there ever has been.

Main Street was 300 yards long (three city blocks). The Bedford Falls set made use of 20 transplanted oak trees, and for the winter scenes, 3,000 tons of shaved ice, 300 tons of gypsum, 300 tons of plaster, and 6,000 gallons of chemicals. It had a work-ing bank and a tree-lined center parkway. Pigeons, cats and dogs were allowed to roam the mammoth set to give it a lived-in feel. Because the story covers different seasons and an alternate town, the set was extremely adaptable. Filming began on April 15, 1946, and ended on July 27, 1946, exactly on schedule for the 90 day deadline to shoot that Capra told studio heads.

Forty-two rings (bells, cash register rings, etc.) are heard over the course of the film. If Clarence Oddbody AS2 (Angel Sec-ond Class) - the Angel sent from heaven to help George - is correct, 42 angels (includ-ing Clarence) received their wings during the film.

James Stewart said that It’s A Wonderful Life was his favorite film he ever made.

It’s a Wonderful Life entered the public domain by accident in the 1970s. In 1946, when the movie was filmed, U.S. copyright protection lasted 28 years, and could be renewed for another 28 years by filing some paperwork and paying a nominal fee. However, Republic Pictures (which Liberty Films had morphed into) neglected to renew the 1946 copyright in 1974, so it entered the public domain and was shown by any television station that wanted to broadcast it. It’s A Wonderful Life became immensely popular on television thanks to repeated showings. Stations programmed it heavily during the holidays, paying no royalties to its producers, and more than 100 distributors sold the movie on tape.

Republic regained control of the lucra-tive film in 1993 by flexing a new Supreme

Court ruling that determined that the holder of a copyright to a story from which a movie was made had certain property rights over the movie itself. Since Re-public still owned the copyrighted story behind It’s a Wonderful Life, and had also purchased exclusive rights to the movie’s copyrighted music, it was able to essen-tially yank the movie out of the public domain. Republic claimed that since It’s A Wonderful Life relied on these copyrighted works, the film could no longer be shown without the studio’s blessing.

In 1994, Republic signed a “long-term” deal granting NBC exclusive rights to broadcast the movie, and the network typically does so between one and three times a year.

It’s A Wonderful Life won’t re-enter the public domain until well into the 21st century as some copyright laws last for up to 95 years.

According to an interview with Karolyn Grimes - the actress who played Zuzu - the name Zuzu comes from Zu Zu Ginger Snaps. George Bailey makes reference to this near the end of the movie when he says to Zuzu at the top of the stairs, “Zuzu my little Ginger Snap!”

It’s a Wonderful Life was Donna Reed’s first starring role.

The cry-your-eyes-out ending of the movie in George’s living room originally ended with the song “Ode to Joy.” not “Auld Lang Syne.”

Mr. Potter never gets punished for stealing $8,000 from Uncle Billy. Capra said that he wanted to remind us that sometimes bad people get away with do-ing bad things.

In 2004, BBC TV listings magazine “Radio Times” conducted a poll into the Best Film Never to Have Won an Oscar. It’s a Wonderful Life came in second. “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994) came in first. Shawshank also failed at the box office, but is now considered one of the greatest films of all time.

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Summers

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Carrigan

Top foods people craveHave you had a hankering for a Dove

Bar, some chocolate chip cookies or milk chocolate candy bars lately? How about a craving for some Mac & Cheese, a plate of French fries or a bag of potato chips?

If any of the above tasty treats rings a salivary bell in your brain, you’re in good company. According to WebMD, those six items are the top foods that people say they crave.

Simply put, a food craving is an irresist-ible urge to have a certain food. Specific cravings may be the body’s way of telling you it lacks a certain nutrient or it could be driven by stress, sadness, happiness or plain boredom.

The Tufts University website TuftsNow claims that 97 percent of women and 68 percent of men, who participated in a study published in the journal Appe-tite, reported experiencing them. Food cravings and humans is a complicated relationship.

If you’re one of the millions of Ameri-cans fighting the battle, you may have

been told in the past by a loved one, friend or your doctor that the craving for choco-late, chips or ice cream is all in your head. Well, they’re right.

Recent research says that specific areas of our brains … those responsible for memory and sensing pleasure … are partially to blame for keeping those food cravings coming. The Monell Chemical Senses Center claims that three regions of the brain … the hippocampus, insula and caudate … appear to be activated during food-craving episodes.

When you get past the physiological

reasons for cravings, emotion and desire prove also to be major players in your late night trips to the refrigerator for that bowl of Ben and Jerry’s. “Food cravings arise to satisfy emotional needs, such as calming stress and reducing anxiety,” says Adam Drewnowski, PhD, of the University of Washington, who is a well-known re-searcher on taste and food preferences.

Carbohydrates boost our levels of the hormone serotonin, which elicits a calming effect as does the combination of sugar and fat. The problem with our relationship with fatty foods is that fat is an evolutionary attraction that is embed-ded in our genes for survival in times of famine.

The experts at WebMD offered these tips for dealing with food cravings.

Control your access to the foods that you crave. Buy a piece of that chocolate cake, instead of the whole cake.

Make lower-calorie choices, whenever possible. Yogurt instead of ice cream, low-fat cookies lieu of the real deal and let

diet-sodas replace the high sugar bever-ages.

Don’t let yourself get too hungry. Eating several small meals throughout the day can help control food cravings and binge-eating.

And finally, start a cravings journal. Keep a journal for a month logging the times you have a craving, the emotions you feel at the time, the foods you crave and what and how much you ate. Then look for patterns that you can exercise control over.

Gotta go … the Donut Mill is calling. Or should I go to My Sweet Escape or per-haps, Andrews Candies? Hmmm?

Cord Prettyman is a certified Master Personal Trainer and owner of Absolute Workout Fitness and Post-Re-hab Studio in Woodland Park. He can be reached at 687-7437, by email at [emailprotected] or though his website at www.cordprettyman.com.

Before there was DenverIn the 1849 gold rush to California,

small amounts of gold were found in the Platte River across Kansas Territory and Nebraska. Some of the gold seekers tried their hand at panning, but met with limited success. No real substantial finds

McFarland continues on Page 10

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10 Pikes Peak Courier December 17, 2014

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were reported until 1858 in the area where Cherry Creek met the South Platte. Once the word was spread of the validity of the find, a new rush was on.

The westward push was led by the cry “Pikes Peak or Bust,” even though the gold was not actually at the Peak. The real hot spot was at the river junction, but no one knew a better landmark than the already

famous mountain. Once more people arrived, adventuresome prospectors soon headed from there into the mountains looking for the source or the “mother lode.” Kansas Territory extended west into the mountains, and the first settlement of any importance was named for a Kansas congressman named Denver, hoping he would help them separate this territory from the plains state.

Many old Indian trails provided access by foot and horseback west into the rug-ged mountains. One of these was Ute Pass. Early travelers had used the Indian path

over the hills into the northern slope of Pikes Peak. Fountain Creek rushed down a nearby gorge, too tight for more than someone climbing. Occasionally gold was found in the creek, but never enough to cause any excitement. A camp at the base of the pass was called El Paso City, but it did not last long. Later another one called El Dorado became equally short lived.

Colorado City became a pivotal supply area in 1859 for Ute Pass travelers. Pros-pectors had discovered gold at the upper end of the Arkansas River, at a place called Oro City. At the time there were only a few

settlements of any kind between Chey-enne and Santa Fe; Colorado City, Foun-tain, Pueblo, Hicklin’s (between Pueblo and present day Walsenburg) Grey’s Ranch (near present day Trinidad), Trinidad and Las Vegas, N.M. The pass at Colorado City brought a lot of travelers, heading for California Gulch and Oro City.

In 1861 Colorado was finally approved as a Territory, and Colorado City became the county seat for El Paso County. In 1862 Colorado City was among the suggestions for the location of the capitol that were rejected in favor of Denver.

Continued from Page 9

McFarland

Kids are smarter these days, says educatorUte Pass expects to meet education challengesBy Pat [emailprotected]

Editor’s note: This is the second in a se-ries about education. This week’s segment is about team work and collaborative learn-ing as a pathway to the future. Next week, the Courier will talk to second-and fourth-grade teachers about field experience and “teaching to the test.”

For Chris Briggs-Hale, principal at Ute Pass Elementary School, meeting the chal-lenges of today’s education responsibilities is critical to the survival of the nation’s pub-lic schools.

“Kids know very well that content is ev-erywhere; you no longer just go to the li-brary or just pick up a book to get content. You no longer just go to school,” he said.

The teachers at the school, which is part of the Manitou Springs School District, get it. “Kids of today need more self-directed education; they’re wiser,” said fifth-grade teacher Greg DiFiore. “They all have com-puters and they’re looking for something that’s going to interest them.”

DiFiore’s students build websites, give presentations via iPad on subjects they’ve chosen to research. Their projects range from creating an iMovie and making ice cream to researching hotels in Italy. “The student’s dad had gone to Italy and she was interested, did a project on all the different hotels and showed pictures,” DiFiore said.

The fifth-grade Genius Hour includes blogging about their projects and publish-ing reports. “Kids of today need to be mo-tivated,” DiFiore said. “When I first started teaching 20 years ago, that wasn’t the case. Kids then were more willing to just go along with whatever was in the textbook. Today, I think it’s great because it personalizes edu-cation, makes it more interesting.”

Miles Groth teaches sixth-grade at the school’s Mountain Academy for the Arts and Sciences. This year is the first for Colo-rado’s adoption of new standards.

“The Common Core standards are built to be something that will apply to situations later on in life, so it’s about finding ways to do that within the classroom,” Groth said.

For instance, Groth has applied real-world status to finding ratios and percent-ages. “The kids went outside one day dur-ing recess and surveyed eye color of the students,” Groth said. “They took that infor-mation and the percentages of different eye colors. Instead of doing worksheets, we’re pulling in data - and that’s more applicable to real life.”

In the academy, Genius Hour includes having the class build a business from scratch. “So there are research, design, math and literacy skills,” Groth said. “And it becomes more authentic when they’re asked to do it in a real-life application.”

To enhance a history lesson, Groth’s stu-dents built a model of a battle scene during WWII. “I want to show that they’re learning but there is not one specific way to teach,” he said. “There are many ways to encour-age learning - when we talk about curiosity we’re going to have kids who are more will-ing to do those challenging things, to be cu-rious about things, if it’s not the same thing over and over again.”

For Briggs-Hale, collaboration prepares students for the demands of today’s work-force. “You want kids to learn how to work in a cutting edge industry, get along with people who are hard to get along with, reach consensus and bring the best out of your teammates, like they do at Google and Apple and at the best think tanks in America,” he said. “To get to that, you have to teach kids what collaboration really looks like. That’s a huge curriculum in and of it-self. You have to teach them what innova-tion looks like, what divergent thinkers ex-pect them to do.”

Sixth-graders at Ute Pass Elementary, who have launched the school’s Mountain Academy of the Arts and Sciences taught by Miles Groth, built a model of a battle scene during WWII. The assignment is part of the school’s dedication to tapping into student curiosity about history by person-alizing learning.

Greg DiFiore, �fth-grade teacher at Ute Pass Elementary School, incites curiosity with the Genius Hour, a time for students to choose a subject to research, write about, blog and publish on the computer. Photos by Pat Hill

Ute Pass Elementary School is embarking on a curriculum of per-sonalized learning and collabora-tion. From left, Chris Briggs-Hale, the school’s principal, and Jacob Sampson, second-grade teacher; and Jesse Black, who teaches fourth-grade.

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BakeryOpen EARLY at 6am! Kolaches Cupcakes

Muffins Custom Cakes Pies Cookies

and Much More!

112 S. Elm Street. Woodland Park, CO 80863(Gold Hill Square – North next to movie theatre)

719-687-8000www.MySweetEscapeBakery.com

It’s not to late to order your Christmas goodies to be picked up by Dec 23!

Gift boxes of Assorted Kolaches

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Dear Editor:

The 2014 Gold Camp Christmas Holi-day Headframe Lighting annual event is underway; this tradition would not be possible without several individuals and groups who deserve a huge thank you. Their time and effort make the event hap-pen each year. The event is 17 years old and is sponsored by the Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Co., Southern Teller County Focus Group, Cripple Creek Parks and Recreation and Black Hills Energy.

This event, which runs Thanksgiving weekend through New Year’s Day, requires several days of preparation in the fall months and hours of volunteer work dur-ing the event. Volunteers from CC&V and the STCFG plan the event, place genera-tors and coordinate volunteers to staff the fi ve sites that require generators. In addition, volunteers manage several sites that are hard line powered.

Thanks to CC&V management and security folks, who allow use of the non-public sites and access to them. The mine also donates all the gas, lights, and most of the power for the project. Thanks to Shawn Tomlinson, Jody Keel, and Brigitte “Getta” Florquist of CC&V who make this happen every year. Thanks also to the CC&V Environmental Department staff (Jeff Campbell, and Gary Horton), who set and retrieve generators. Thanks to Jane Mannon who budgets for the lights each year.

Thanks to Black Hills Energy whose staff and bucket truck are instrumental with the repair of ornaments and for donating transformers for several sites. Thanks to our anonymous donor, who 14 years ago, donated six generators for this project; thanks to care and maintenance by JET Service, most of them are still run-ning.

And this year we need to add a huge thanks to the Watson family of Victor and

Two Mile High Mining Co. for bring-ing back a favorite ornament from the original couple of years of the event – the Silver Bell on the Strong Mine on Victor’s north side.

Thanks to Cripple Creek Parks and Recreation and Fire Department who donate gas and time to start the Volcano generators. Thanks to Jim Huffman and family for allowing us to use the Volcano site. Thanks to the Cripple Creek Dis-trict Museum staff, who keep the Gold Sovereign star lighted and donates power for that.

Thanks to the community volunteers who brave the cold, wind and snow to start generators and check power connec-tions:, Richard Courson and Lisa McIn-tosh, Gary and Martha Horton, Chevy Groves and Lisa Cannon, Shawn Tomlin-son, Jon Zalewski; and to Joe and Marjie Stevens, Kirk Meyer, and Veldean Petri who helped with powered sites this year.

And many thanks to those who donate to the STCFG throughout the year as your monetary donations help fund this event.

If there are folks who have been ac-cidentally left out of the list above, or help after this letter is written and printed, but please be assured that your efforts do not go unappreciated or unnoticed. Each year we receive a variety of thanks from locals and visitors alike – everyone who lives and visits here loves seeing the colorful decorations high on the mountains above our towns and, without all of your as-sistance and support, the holidays around the mining camp would be much darker.

If you are interested in helping in 2015, volunteering time or donating funds, please email [emailprotected]. Tour maps are also located online at Vic-torColorado.com.

Thanks and Happy Holidays to all!Ruth Zalewski, Southern Teller County

Focus Group, POB 238, Victor

Hit the Silk Road at Denver museum Interactive exhibit takes visitors on trip in ancient world By Sonya Ellingboe [emailprotected]

Look for a couple of life-sized Bactrian camels and perhaps several enactors in exotic costumes (Kang Baobi,Ma Amri, Shi Dara and more) … You’ll know you have arrived at the “Traveling the Silk Road” ex-hibit at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science (through May 3, 2015).

The colorful interactive exhibit, which originated with the American Museum of Natural History in New York, in collabo-ration with museums in Italy, Singapore, Australia and Taiwan, takes visitors on a trip that once involved 5,700 miles over deserts, mountains and through fi ve major cities of the time — or across sometimes stormy seas.

It really wasn’t a single road, but a com-plex network of routes between the Far East and Eastern Europe. Some traces re-main today.

Trade goods included gold, art, glass, fur, wines, spices, dyes and silk. A huge Tang-era loom shows how silk was woven and a display tells us about the carefully cultivated silk worms.

The journey begins in Xian, the imperial city of the Tang Dynasty (A.D. 618-907) — the largest city in the world at that time. In addition to the giant loom, one can handle and play individual musical instruments, or a group might try to create music — and fi nd a camel caravan to join.

The second stop is the important mar-ket town, Turfan, a central Asian oasis be-tween the Gobi and Talikmakan deserts. A recreation of a night market offers gems, silks, leopard furs and peaco*ck feathers and fragrant perfumes and spices. (Look for a take-home recipe card here.) The city also had vineyards and a complicated irri-gation system, which is reproduced.

Next destination is Samarkand, located in today’s Uzbekistan, a major trading cen-ter for caravan merchants. It was also a center for paper-making and metalwork. Families will enjoy an interactive map here, as well as historic paper objects and an an-cient Persian coin.

Baghdad, now in Iraq, is the next stop on the route. Museum material says that

it was “a hub of commerce and learning,” a major attraction for intellectuals about A.D. 800 due to a library and translation institute. There is also a model of a 71-foot-long Arab dhow, capable of moving large, heavy goods, and a model of an ancient Islamic astrolab. The art of glass-blowing also reached new heights here.

Finally, the imaginary journey reaches Constantinople, now Istanbul, which was a port, heavily fortifi ed and a major desti-nation for traders. A display of “objects of desire” from the DMNS collection shows many luxury items that appeared in Con-stantinople.

A storytelling interpreter, portrayed by a DMNS actor, explains about “Traveling the Silk Road” to visitors. Courtesy photos

Costumed interpreters tell viewrers about a market scene in the Denver Museum of Nature and Science “Traveling the Silk Road” exhibit.

IF YOU GOThe Denver Museum of Nature & Science is at 2001

Colorado Blvd., Denver. It is open every day from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Christmas. Information and tickets: 303-370-6000, dmns.org/traveling-the-silk-road.

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12 Pikes Peak Courier December 17, 2014

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LIFEP I K E S P E A K

Victor teenager dances in ‘�e Nutcracker’ this weekendBy Pat [emailprotected]

At the age of 15, MeiLyn Kennedy per-forms lead roles in “The Nutcracker,” next week at the Pikes Peak Center. Presented by the Ballet Society and the Children’s Chorale of Colorado Springs, the perfor-mances are another step in Kennedy’s dance to become a professional

Dedicated and driven by youthful exu-berance and optimism, Kennedy was cho-sen to train for the past two summers with the American Ballet Theatre in Manhattan.

“That was a really good experience. It definitely opened my eyes to a lot of things, to other people who have so much drive - and to what I have to match up to all the time,” she said. “It showed me how big the dance world is and how hard it is.”

Kennedy has a role model in her moth-er, Stacy Smith, who grew up in New York and trained with a dance company in Manhattan. Over the next several years, Smith performed in Maryland, Venezuela, Florida and Colorado.

After retiring as a professional, Smith and her husband, Brent Kennedy, settled down in Victor. In the early 1990s, Smith founded the Cresson Dance Company, which evolved into the ideal training stage for MeiLyn.

Eventually, Smith left Cresson to accept a teaching position with the Ballet Society. “I recognized that dancing was what Mei-Lyn wanted to do - and she needed some-thing bigger than I could provide her,” Smith said. “All the decisions since then have been about her. There’s no question in my mind that I want to support her.”

Today the two lead a kind of merry-go-round lifestyle, what some would consider frenetic but, for Kennedy and Smith, the goal is more important than the inconve-nience.

“I have a personal standard for myself and when I don’t meet that standard I get really frustrated,” Kennedy said. “Some-times I don’t want to do what I do, but if I don’t, I’ll be upset with myself. And then I do it.”

Included in the five-day a week practice schedule are the online classes through Colorado Connections Academy - she’s in the 10th grade.

“Friday I have off,” she said. “Wow!”During the holiday season, Kennedy

performs benefit events where children are in the audience. Most of the time, the performances remove the days off.

“I really like doing outreach, to get people into dancing. I like the fact that it shows younger kids that you can dance if you want to,” she said. “To me, that’s very important.”

In some ways, Kennedy is a typical teenager, evidenced by a recent bicycle accident on a dirt road near the family’s home in Victor. While the spill left her with a black eye, she expects the evidence to be gone by next week.

Along with the physical activities, she bakes, takes photos, writes and socializes with her friends.

“You definitely need to find a balance

between having a life and dancing,” she said.

Rather fluke or fate, Kennedy’s rise through the ranks as an American dancer is the indirect result of a flier posted in a laundromat in Woodland Park nearly 15 years ago. The flier announced that Chi-nese babies were available for adoption.

“I had no interest in having kids, always felt my students were my kids,” Smith said. “I didn’t recognize a mothering instinct within myself, always thought I was pretty selfish.”

Kennedy balks. “So not true,” she said.Yet the flier struck an emotional chord

within Smith - and the dancer-to-be ar-rived in the U.S. with her new parents at the age of 11 months.

The teenager and her mother have an easy camaraderie, a relationship strength-ened by mutual respect and dedication to the goal. “My goal is to dance with a major ballet company. If I don’t get accepted into a company of my choice, I’ll start looking at contemporary companies - because I still would like to dance,” Kennedy said. “I’m never going to stop dancing.”

“The Nutcracker” is at 7 p.m. Dec. 22 and at 4 and 7 p.m. Dec. 23 at the Pikes Peak Center. Kennedy dances the Lead Spanish role on Dec. 22 and Clara on the 23rd.

The Ballet Society of Colorado Springs and the Colorado Youth Ballet present the 10th annual production of “The Nutcracker” Dec. 22 and Dec. 23. Meilyn Kennedy of Victor Clara in the Dec. 23rd production. Photo by Ted Mehl

Meilyn Kennedy dances the Arabian lead in Ballet Society’s 2013 Nutcracker. Photo by Ted Mehl

Meilyn Kennedy plays the lead Spanish with other members of Ballet Society Nutcracker cast. Photo by Ted Mehl

Meilyn Kennedy, 15, has been dancing since she was �ve years old. Kennedy’s mother, Stacy Smith, founded the Cresson Dance Company in southern Teller County, where her daughter discovered her passion for dance. Courtesy photo

Victor teenager stars in Nutcracker

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Pikes Peak Courier 13 December 17, 2014

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Holidayddddddddddddddddayddaydayw o r s h i p

dddddddddddddddddayddaydayddddddddaydayChristmas Eve Candlelight Service at 5PM-6PM

New Years Eve Service 8PM-Midnight

For more information, go to www.prayermountainco.com

107 West Henrietta Ave. Woodland Park, CO 80863 • (719) 687-7626

You are invited to join us for a...

Christmas Eve

*Sponsored by Highland Bible Churchwww.highlandbiblechurch.org

For information call 331-4903

Wednesday,December

24th

6:00 PM

Ute PassCultural Center

210 E. Midland Ave.Woodland Park

Celebration!

Join us during Advent atMountain View

United Methodist Church1101 Rampart Range Road • Woodland Park

719.687.3868

December 14 - 10:30 amThird Sunday in Advent

“Love…Fills the Air” – Luke 2: 1-7

Monday, December 15 - 7:00 pmBlue Christmas Service

A time to acknowledge the “Blue” feelingswe experience at Christmas

December 21 - 10:30 amFourth Sunday in Advent

“Ceremony of Candles”Christmas Cantata by the Chancel Choir

Wednesday, 24Christmas Eve Candlelight Worship Services

6:00 pm Family Christmas Service8:00 pm Christmas Eve Service with the Chancel & Bell Choirs

“Light…Shines in the Darkness”: - Luke 2: 1-20

THE LIGHTDeliverance, Healing, Restoration, Salvation

213 Aspen Garden Way Unit 3Woodland Park, CO 80863

[emailprotected] Hanco*ck 719.687.9820

Deliverance, Healing, Restoration, SalvationDeliverance, Healing, Restoration, Salvation

SERVICE TIMESSunday Service – 3pm

Wednesday Night Bible Study 7pm

SERVICE TIMESSunday Service – 3pm

Wednesday Night Bible Study 7pm

SERVICE TIMESSunday Service – 3pm

Wednesday Night Bible Study 7pm

Seasonc e l e b r a t e

Seasont h e

Fleetwood photos on display in DenverMusician sometimes adds paint to his nature shotsBy Sonya [emailprotected]

Drummer Mick Fleetwood, a founding member of the multi-hit rock band Fleet-wood Mac, which played at the Pepsi Cen-ter on Dec. 12, is a many-faceted artist.

Musician, yes, but also art photogra-pher and author. As the band is touring, so is a traveling exhibit of his photographs, “Reflections: The Mick Fleetwood Collec-tion,” which is displayed at Fascination Street Art in Cherry Creek through Dec. 31, where he met briefly with collectors on Dec. 11.

Fleetwood said, in an interview in the Arizona Republic, that his father always had a nice camera and shot photos as the family traveled — a practice the musician started himself many years ago, when on the road with the hugely popular band.

Numerous prints accumulated, and a friend in Hawaii suggested he consider exhibiting them.

Fleetwood and bassist John McVie formed the band in 1967, with McVie’s then-wife Christine, a keyboardist/vo-calist, joining in 1970. Popularity really expanded in 1974 when Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham joined on New Year’s Eve.

Eventually, Fleetwood’s photographic eye turned to nature as his subject — when at home in Hawaii or on the way to another concert.

He collected photos of English gar-dens, before he moved his mother to live near him in Hawaii. “When I take a photo, I am primarily trying to capture a feel and a moment …,” he said.

With some prints, he embellishes them with paint to emphasize shapes or colors. “I see colors and highlights that I hope the viewer also sees and with my direction, we have some of the photo canvases en-hanced with paint and texture to feature

those.”His collection also includes images of

the changing scene in Maui, such as an old, rusted truck, abandoned and over-grown by vegetation.

He also said his photos “encompass my reflections on travel, life’s journey and my sense of self-evaluation as well as the re-flection of where we’ve come to and where we might be going.”

In October 2014, his third book, “Play On,” written with Anthony Bozza, was re-leased and the Fleetwood Mac band, with Christine McVie again included, is play-ing a nationwide, sold-out stadium tour. He has also recently opened a restaurant on Maui. He enjoys his four daughters and two grandkids and also maintains a resi-dence in Los Angeles.

Fleetwood, at 67, is going strong.

IF YOU GO

“Re�ections: the Mick Fleetwood Collection” is exhib-ited through Dec. 31 at Fascination Street Fine Art, 315 Detroit St., Denver. 303-333-1566.

Printed on recycled newsprint. Please recycle this copy.

Check us out on these social media websites: Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Linkedin.

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Prices and participation may vary. Additional charge for Extras, as well as substitution of side or drink.Plus applicable taxes. May not be combined with other offers, coupons or discount cards.

All chip-related trademarks are owned by Frito-Lay North America, Inc. ©2014 Doctor’s Associates Inc. SUBWAY® is a registered trademark of Doctor’s Associates Inc.

Prices and participation may vary. Additional charge for Extras, as well as substitution of side or drink.Plus applicable taxes. May not be combined with other offers, coupons or discount cards.

All chip-related trademarks are owned by Frito-Lay North America, Inc. ©2014 Doctor’s Associates Inc. SUBWAY® is a registered trademark of Doctor’s Associates Inc.

Prices and participation may vary. Additional charge for Extras, as well as substitution of side or drink.Plus applicable taxes. May not be combined with other offers, coupons or discount cards.

All chip-related trademarks are owned by Frito-Lay North America, Inc. ©2014 Doctor’s Associates Inc. SUBWAY® is a registered trademark of Doctor’s Associates Inc.

Prices and participation may vary. Additional charge for Extras, as well as substitution of side or drink.Plus applicable taxes. May not be combined with other offers, coupons or discount cards.

All chip-related trademarks are owned by Frito-Lay North America, Inc. ©2014 Doctor’s Associates Inc. SUBWAY® is a registered trademark of Doctor’s Associates Inc.

Prices and participation may vary. Additional charge for Extras, as well as substitution of side or drink.Plus applicable taxes. May not be combined with other offers, coupons or discount cards.

All chip-related trademarks are owned by Frito-Lay North America, Inc. ©2014 Doctor’s Associates Inc. SUBWAY® is a registered trademark of Doctor’s Associates Inc.

Prices and participation may vary. Additional charge for Extras, as well as substitution of side or drink.Plus applicable taxes. May not be combined with other offers, coupons or discount cards.

All chip-related trademarks are owned by Frito-Lay North America, Inc. ©2014 Doctor’s Associates Inc. SUBWAY® is a registered trademark of Doctor’s Associates Inc.

Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining grant fundsDiscovery Center scholartrips for Colorado students Sta� report

Thanks to a generous grant from the Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Co., the Space Foundation recently awarded Discover ScholarTrips to several Teller County schools. These scholarships will enable students to experience a field trip to the Space Foundation’s Discovery Cen-ter in Colorado Springs.

The Discovery Center is the region’s only space, science and technology center. It supports science, technology, engineer-ing and mathematics education through its Lockheed Martin Space Education Center, AGI Space Missions Simulation Laboratory, Mars Robotics Laboratory, Northrop Grumman Science Center fea-turing Science On a Sphere and El Pomar Space Gallery.

After an application process, eight Crip-ple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Co. Discov-er ScholarTrips were awarded, benefiting

more than 350 Teller County students and teachers, including:

• Fourth grade students from Colum-bine Elementary School

• Second grade students from Colum-bine Elementary School

• First grade students from Columbine Elementary School

• Kindergartners from Columbine El-ementary School

• First grade students from Cresson El-ementary School

• Fifth and sixth grade students from Cresson Elementary School

• Kindergartners from Gateway Ele-mentary School

“Students from Woodland Park School District were fortunate recipients of this amazing opportunity supporting hands-on, STEM education,” said Jed Bowman, superintendent of WPSD.

“Our students and teachers are im-pressed with the Space Foundation teach-ing staff and the ‘learning by doing’ ex-perience. This one-of-a-kind experience would not be possible without the ongoing support of the Cripple Creek & Victor Gold

Mining Co., and WPSD is grateful for the opportunity given to our students, and for the partnership with CC&V and the Space Foundation.”

Each ScholarTrip covers the admission fee, as well as a subsidy for bus transpor-tation, one of the biggest obstacles teach-ers face in getting their students out of the classroom and into an engaging field trip experience.

The ScholarTrip recipient teacher chooses from a list of current courses at the Discovery Center that align with their aca-demic needs. All courses meet state and national academic standards.

Learn more about the courses and about Space Foundation education pro-grams at spacefoundation.org/education.

The Discovery Center is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday. Find in-formation about hours, location, fees and exhibits at spacefoundation.org/museum.

About Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Co.Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining

Co. is located in the historic Cripple Creek

Mining District in Teller County. CC&V’s Cresson Project was initiated in 1994, and continues today with over 550 employees operating 24 hours every day of the year. CC&V is principally owned and managed by AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp.

About the Space FoundationFounded in 1983, the Space Foundation

is the foremost advocate for all sectors of space, and is a global, nonprofit leader in space awareness activities, educational programs and major industry events, in-cluding the annual Space Symposium, in support of its mission “to advance space-related endeavors to inspire, enable and propel humanity.” Space Foundation World Headquarters in Colorado Springs has a public Discovery Center, including El Pomar Space Gallery, Northrop Grum-man Science Center featuring Science On a Sphere and the Lockheed Martin Space Education Center. The Space Foundation has a field office in Houston and conducts government affairs from its Washington, D.C., office.

Gold mine grant enables space learning programSta� report

An $11,000 grant from the Cripple Creek and Victor Gold Mining Co. will en-able Teller County students to engage in the array of space- and technology-related educational programs at the Challenger Learning Center in Colorado Springs.

More than 500 Teller County students and teachers will benefit from Colorado- and Next Generation Science Standards-aligned programs, including:

• On-site space simulation missions like Rendezvous With a Comet and Return to Mars

• Distance-delivered missions like

Moon Mars & Beyond and Operation Montserrat

• In-school programs like Magic Planet, We Choose Space and The Night Sky

The grant is a continuation of the Crip-ple Creek and Victor Gold Mining Co.’s support of the only Challenger space sci-ence education center in the Rocky Moun-tain region. CC&V and other Teller County businesses have provided grants for the past several years to enable students to benefit from Challenger programs. Teach-ers choose from a list of current courses at the Challenger Center to support their aca-demic needs.

For more information on the programs, visit clccs.org/Educators.aspx

Cripple Creek’s 2015 budget re�ects improvement plansBy N. W. OliverContributing writer

The city council of Cripple Creek passed the new, 2015 budget as prepared by Finance Director Paul Harris at the Dec. 3 council meeting. The new budget re-flects the council’s decisions to extend the Bennett Avenue Project, improve many of the side streets, reemphasize commu-nity events and historic preservation, and draw more business and businesses to the historic mining town.

All in all, the 2015 budget goes over ex-pected revenues by $119,626. This amount was reached after taking into account the projected growth factor for the commu-nity’s economy of only .28 percent.

In light of these projections, the council will seek a mill levy increase of 1.92 mills upon each dollar of all taxable property within the city.

Also at the meeting, the city council en-

tered into a Memorandum of Understand-ing with the Rodeo Committee, the orga-nizing body of the Cripple Creek Rodeo. The MoU makes the Cripple Creek Rodeo an official City of Cripple Creek event which entitles the rodeo to city funding, advertisem*nt and access to city person-nel and vehicles. The two entities will re-main separate however and the city will only be responsible for funding a maxi-mum of $15,000 for the event.

The Cripple Creek Rodeo has seen great success in its first two years in both the number of spectators attracted to Cripple Creek during the event and in the quality of the spectacle and competition. For it’s opening year, in 2013, it was voted the “Best New Rodeo” by the Colorado Professional Rodeo Association. After the rodeo’s performance this year, it has been nominated to be part of the Colorado Large Purse League. The nomination was announced at the meeting.

at the Museum Center at 10:30. The Museum Center at History Park is located at 231 E. Henrietta Avenue in Woodland Park, next to the library. For information, contact UPHS at 719-686-7512 or check out our website: www.utepasshistoricalsociety.org. Also, like us on Facebook.

UTE PASS Historical Society Main O�ce and book store are open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays in the Museum Center building at History Park, 231 E. Henrietta, next to the Woodland Park Library. Tours of History Park are available during these hours. A $5 donations is appreciated. Call 719-686-7512 at least 15 minutes before a tour. Go to utepasshistoricalsociety.org.

WOODLAND PARK Ceili Club hast monthly ceilis (“kay-lees”), which is Irish for a dance party.The purpose is to bring social Irish dance to the Teller County community. These ceilis are open to the public, with no dance experience required. The dances are taught as part of the event. Visit www.mountain-eire.org and see the Ceili Club tab, or call 686-1325.

WOODLAND PARK Saddle Club, providing community camaraderie among humans and horses since 1947, sponsors gymkhanas, jackpots, dances, barbecues, parades, trail rides and more. Join us. For information, contact [emailprotected]. Visit www.wpsaddleclub.com.

WOODLAND PARK Wind Symphony, under the direction of Craig Harms, rehearses at 7 p.m. Tuesdays in the Woodland Park Middle School band room.All instrumental musicians are welcome. Visit www.woodlandparkwindsymphony.com to learn more about this ensemble and other musical groups which are part of the Woodland Park Wind Symphony, Woodland Winds, Woodland Brass Quintet and Brass Choir and the Swing Factory Big Band. Craig can also be reached at 719-687-2210.

YOGA CLASSES are o�ered at 9 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, with a senior class at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays, at the Florissant Grange, 2009 County Road 31. Certi�ed instructor. Everyone welcome. Call Debbie at 719-748-3678 for informa-tion.

YOGA CLASSES are o�ered in Woodland Park. All levels are welcome. Contact Michelle Truscelli at 719-505-5011 or check out www.shakti3yoga.com for information.

YOGA FOR Every Body 2014 yoga classes o�ered at various locations in the Pikes Peak area. All classes free or by dona-tion.Call Stacy for more information at 719-689-5745 or email [emailprotected].

XINGYI IS o�ered from 7-9 p.m. Wednesdays at the Wood-land Park Recreation Center. Must be 18 or older. Contact Je� at 816-260-8595 for information.

SOCIAL

A COURSE in Miracles classes meets at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays in Woodland Park. Call 719-286-8421 or e-mail [emailprotected] for information.

A PEACE Visioning You may think you are limited in your ability to improve conditions on earth. Nothing is further from the truth. You can be an instrument for change by adding to the love and peace sent worldwide from the peace visioning circle - either silently, verbally, or visually. The circle is for people from all walks of life with a passion to bring unity and light into our world. We gather at 10:30 a.m. every Saturday in Woodland Park. Contact Barbara Royal, CSD, 719-687-6823 or [emailprotected].

ABOVE THE Clouds Cruisers meet the �rst Friday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at 1120 West Bowman Ave., Woodland Park. For information contact Marsh at 719-687-1058.

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Cozy log home on large, sunny lot with great Southern Exposure and views of the Sangre De Cristos! Very energy e�cient. Solid log interior and open �oor plan. Kitchen has ceramic tile �oors and a large pantry. Master suite with attached bath. Family room with wood-burning �replace, laundry room, 2 bedrooms, full size bath and a private walk-out. All appliances are included!

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It’s season’s greetings to CC/V taxpayersBy Pat [emailprotected]

Taxpayers in the Cripple Creek/Victor School District received an early Christmas gift this month. With the district’s refinancing the voter-approved bonds of 2007 and 2008, the savings amounted to more than $2.5 million.

“We secured an average interest rate of 2.11 percent, lowering the av-erage interest rate of 4.5 percent on the existing bonds,” said Les Lindau-er, the district’s superintendent. “It’s a good deal.”

Lindauer secured the lower interest rate, thus reducing the payment schedule by two years, with RBC Capital Markets. “I’m thrilled for the taxpayers,” he said.

Cripple Creek/Victor School District has re�nanced outstanding bonds from 2007 and2008 and captured a lower interest rate. Photo by Pat Hill

Ice skating has impressive lineageActivity may have been developed 5,000 years agoBy Metro Creative Connection

Although many people shy away from coasting across a sheet of thin ice when the temperature drops outside, fans of ice skating and hockey willingly don their blades and effortlessly traverse a rink. Ice skating has become a recreational activity and sport tied to the winter season. Since its inception, ice skating has garnered thousands of fans and enthusiasts around the world.

While ice skating is now known as a rec-reational activity, it was born out of neces-sity thousands of years ago. A new study by Federico Formenti, a human biomechan-ics specialist at the University of Oxford, suggests that ice skating was developed in Finland more than 5,000 years ago. Researchers surmised that southern Fin-land was the one area of northern Europe that was flat enough to make traveling by skates worthwhile. It is believed that an-cient Finns used animal bones tied to their feet to coast across the frozen landscape and reduce travel time when daylight during cold, winter months was a limited commodity.

The first ice skates employed straps and animal bones, mainly horse bones, in their design. The oldest pair of skates found dates back to about 3,000 B.C. and were discovered at the bottom of a lake in Switzerland. An old Dutch word for skate is “schenkel,” which means “leg bone.”

Historians also believe that ancient peoples who used ice skates relied on re-sidual animal fat left on the bone as well as wooden poles to propel themselves across the ice — much in the way a cross-country skier would coast across the snow. The gliding style of ice skating now asso-ciated with seasoned athletes likely didn’t begin until metal blades were introduced around the 13th century.

Although ice skating started as a trans-portation method, eventually it became recreational as well. In some areas of the

world, all classes of people could partici-pate in ice skating. However, in other re-gions, ice skating was reserved for royalty

and people of the upper class.By the 18th century, ice skating was well

known and enjoyed throughout much of Europe. As people emigrated to America, they brought their ice skating customs with them. Also at this time, ice skating started to become subdivided into differ-ent specialties, such as figure skating and speed skating.

The first instructional book written concerning ice skating was published in London in 1772 and authored by a British artillery lieutenant named Robert Jones. It was designed for men to learn the basic positions of skating and how to achieve circles and figure eights.

While ice skating may have origi-nated in Europe, the style of skating that evolved into figure skating was developed and honed by American Jackson Haines. Haines eschewed the rigid British style of figure skating that was merely tracing shapes for a style that included elements of ballet and other dance to offer fluidity of movement. Haines’ style was accepted by many skaters in Switzerland and the Neth-erlands, and eventually he established the Vienna School to teach others this artistic style of skating. Haines died young, but his teaching methods at the school prevailed and led to the development of the Inter-national Skating Union in 1892. The Union drafted the first official set of codified fig-ure skating rules.

Figure skating continued through the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Ath-letes began to emerge who would be best known for their signature moves, some of which would be permanently added to the figure skating lexicon.

Modern figure skating has four Olympic divisions, including ladies’ singles, men’s singles, pair skating and ice dancing. The International Skating Union also recog-nizes speed skating on a traditional long track as well as short track speed skating as the main offshoots of the ancient form of ice skating.

The �rst ice skates looked nothing like these. Photo by Metro Creative

AMERICAN LEGION Post 1980 Woodland Park meets at 7 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of each month at Grange Hall on Hwy 67, about three miles north of the US-24/Hwy-67 junction in Woodland Park. Visit http://post1980.org.

AMERICAN LEGION Post 171 meets at 7 p.m. at the Post Building, 400 East Carr Ave. in Cripple Creek.

ART RECEPTION Today is planned for the second Friday of the month and will feature a di�erent artist at Park State Bank in Woodland Park.

BILL HARPER, as seen on the Grand Ole Opry, performs 4-7 p.m. every Saturday at Oney’s Restaurant in Florissant. Enjoy old country classic music in a family friendly atmosphere.

CC&V COFFEE Club meets at 10 a.m. Mondays at the Cripple Creek and Victor Gold Mining Company Visitor Center, 371 E. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek. Chat with friends over a cup of co�ee, or network with

businesspeople. Not just co�ee, but also refreshments and free Wi-Fi will be provided as you sit and visit with others and get the latest community news, or mining information. Refreshment donations will be given to the Aspen Mine Center. Contact the CC&V Visitor Center at 719-689-2341, or Brad Poulson at 719-689-4052 for more information.

COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “B” is looking for civic minded people who wish to volunteer and contribute to their community. We primarily serve Teller and Park counties, and assist other troops throughout the state. Troop B meets at 6 p.m. the �rst Thursday of each month at the Highland Bible Church, 800 Research Drive, Woodland Park. We are an all-volunteer organization that is recognized as an aux-iliary law enforcement agency by the state of Colorado. We assist law enforcement agencies, forest service, and search and rescue organizations. Experience is not necessary, just a willingness to contribute to your com-munity. To volunteer, or for more information, contact us through www.coloradoranger.org.

COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “I” is looking for responsible and dedicated volunteers who want to make a di�erence serving their community. You are invited to our monthly meeting the �rst Friday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Pikes Peak National Bank, in the upstairs conference room, 2401 W. Colorado Ave, on the corner of Colorado Ave and 24th Street. Free park-ing is available for the meeting in the bank employee parking lot on the south side of the bank’s drive-up facility. Visit http://itroop.coloradoranger.org or e-mail [emailprotected].

CRIPPLE CREEK Friendship Club meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Henry C. “June” Hack Arena in City Park. The club is free and o�ers an opportunity to meet with acquaintances and make new friends.

DIVIDE PLAYGROUP meets from 9-10: 30 a.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at Community Partnership in Divide. Ffdd program. Call 686-0705 more more info. Drop-ins welcome.

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Undocumented woman unbowed, unbrokenWhen she was 11 and caring for four younger brothers

and sisters in a rural Mexican town, Rocío Méndez looked into her heart for strength.

When she was 15, hiding in a dumpster from immigra-tion officers in Arizona after walking four days through desert and mountains, she looked into her heart for cour-age.

Last week, when she completed the last exam needed for her college degree, Rocío, now 22, again looked into her heart. This time, she found happiness.

“Education has always been my heart,” she said. “Education has always been my motivation. It has been my life.”

The passion to learn has been the fire that propelled her through unimaginable adversity — drug-war violence, family tragedy, poverty and hunger — and that lifted her when hope threatened to slip from her grasp.

“Her story is nothing less than a miracle,” her high school teacher Lisa Wille-Racine said. “She was relent-less. … She is relentless. She didn’t ever lose sight of her dream.”

But the dream isn’t finished: It won’t be until she can live and work here legally.

Hope amid tumultThat goal could become reality under a provision in

President Obama’s proposed executive order, which in-cludes revisions to the 2012 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. DACA, as it is known, excluded Rocío because she arrived here in 2008, one year too late. The Nov. 20 proposal, however, expands the cutoff to 2010 and gives those children a three-year reprieve from deportation and the opportunity to apply for the needed permit to work.

Republicans have threatened to block the president’s immigration action when Congress reconvenes in January. But amid the political tumult, Rocío — who has lobbied with fellow students for the still-unpassed DREAM Act in Washington, D.C. — and Wille-Racine stay optimistic.

Regardless of how one feels about Obama, Wille-Racine said, “at least he sees the richness and the powerfulness and the extraordinariness of kids who don’t call their country home any more. These are kids with no country who see the only way to rise above poverty is through education.”

Petite with black hair just beyond her shoulders and a wide but rare smile, Rocío is one of 1.4 million undocu-mented students in the U.S. brought here by parents who entered illegally. Many, as in Rocío’s case, were searching for a better life. Each year, according to studies, about 65,000 undocumented students graduate from American high schools. But, impeded by financial hardship and lack of legal documentation, fewer than 10,000 enroll in college.

When Rocío graduated — with honors — from a Castle Rock high school in 2010, Colorado did not offer in-state tuition to undocumented students. So, with Wille-Racine’s help, she enrolled in New Mexico Highlands University in Las Vegas, N.M., where she met criteria for in-state tuition offered also to students in her situation.

Today, 18 states allow in-state tuition rates for undocu-mented students. Fourteen do so through legislation. The first were California and Texas in 2001; New Mexico did so in 2005; Colorado joined the group in 2013.

Rocío, who has always wanted to be a teacher, remem-bers sitting in the office at Highlands’ School of Education: “The adviser … told me you can get an education, you can study to be a teacher. At the end, you’re not going to be eligible to teach because you have no legal status.”

The words shattered Rocío. She turned to Wille-Racine, tears in her eyes. “There is nothing for me here,” she said.

Wille-Racine reassured her there would be something. “Politics are changing quickly,” she said. “In four years, we can decide if it was worth it or not.”

Accident changed allTo fully understand the price of that leap of faith, you

have to go back to the beginning of Rocío’s story.The family lived in a town of fewer than 500 people

about two hours southeast of Mexico City. Her father, who finished two years of elementary school, grew flowers to sell in the city. Her mother, who completed sixth grade, cared for the children.

Tragedy struck when Rocío’s 18-month-old sister was critically injured in a car accident. To provide the best

medical care, her father borrowed money and sold everything he could, including the land on which

he grew his flowers, to send her to a private hospital. Her sister eventually recovered, but her father could no longer earn enough to support the family.

“You have to have money to pay — if you don’t, that person is going to die,” Rocío said. After two months “we didn’t have any money. In Mexico, we couldn’t survive anymore.”

Her parents crossed the border in 2001 and ended up in Castle Rock, where he worked construction and landscaping and she cleaned hotels and businesses. The children stayed behind with grandparents, but Rocío — beginning at age 11 — essentially became the mom.

She bought groceries, cooked, got them ready for school, talked to teachers about their progress. Most importantly, she said, she kept them safe, including from drug dealers who wanted payments for security.

All the while, she excelled in her studies, winning top prizes in her classes.

“I was so anxious to learn, to know stuff,” she said. “I was happy because going to school was going to make a difference.”

But when it came time for high school, the family didn’t have the money to pay for the better private education in Mexico. And the culture discouraged girls from continuing school. That included her family.

A teacher recommended Rocío study in the United States. It’s better over there, he said.

“Since that day,” she said, “I want to go to school. I want to go to school. I want to go to school … I didn’t know I was going to walk. I didn’t know it was so danger-ous. I just knew I wanted to go to school.”

Rocío’s parents had returned to Mexico in 2004 when her grandmother died. A year later, her dad went back to Castle Rock. And in February 2008, her mother decided to rejoin him and bring Rocío and her then-five younger siblings. They tried to get student visas to emigrate legally, Rocío said, but didn’t have enough money. So, with a guide and Rocío’s uncle, they crossed the border on foot.

Rocío and the adults carried the heaviest of six bags, which held tuna, bread, beans and gallons of water — enough, they thought, for four days. They walked mostly at night and slept under bushes during daylight. They crossed deserts, mountains, highways and ranches. They skirted an airport. They ran out of water on the second day. By the third day, the two men gave up their food por-tions so the children could eat.

On the fourth day, as the group walked along train tracks near a factory in Arizona, a man saw them and began talking on his phone.

“Ya nos echaron la migra — they’ve called immigra-tion,” her uncle yelled. “Scatter and run!”

Her uncle covered Rocío’s mother, two sisters and a brother with sand in a nearby dry creek bed. Another brother climbed up a tree. Rocío jumped into a dumpster filled with trash. She heard dogs barking and police talk-ing. She stayed there for hours, until her uncle came for her.

“It was something I hope I never have to live again,” she said.

That evening, they reached a hotel in a town called Guadalupe, south of Phoenix where her father — who in 2010 received a work permit — picked them up. He took them to Walmart to buy food and clothes.

“Oh, my God,” Rocío said, as she wandered through the store. “This is amazing.”

Strange new worldIn Castle Rock, Rocío entered school in March as a

sophom*ore — 14 credits transferred from her high school in Mexico.

“The first day I was so scared, I didn’t talk to anyone,” she said. “The only thing I knew how to say was `Hi.’ I was happy to be able to continue my education. I was eating lunch and I told myself, `You have to work hard — this isn’t going to be easy.’”

It wasn’t.Many days, the frustration of being unable to commu-

nicate in English, the struggle academically, the isolation socially, left her in tears. That’s how Wille-Racine met her, crying, huddled in a corner behind a teacher’s desk.

“I saw those little eyes looking at me and I said, `Well, hello,’” Wille-Racine said. “That moment changed the rest of my life.”

That moment threw Wille-Racine, a Spanish and Eng-lish as a Second Language teacher and mother of 15-year-old twins, into an unfamiliar world she would come to know intimately — the limbo and uncharted territory of undocumented students. And Rocío’s determination to succeed in school, despite the unceasing obstacles, moved her deeply.

“She was fierce,” Wille-Racine said. “So I decided to be fierce right along her side.”

When it came time for college, the teacher and the student figured it out as they went: whom to call, where to go, what to do.

On her end, Rocío scrambled to find ways to pay for the education she so desperately wanted. She worked two jobs during summers, including cleaning hotels. She borrowed money from friends, which she later repaid. She won a $6,000 scholarship. She cleaned and cooked in re-turn for room and food. At times, she gave up food money

for tuition money.Teachers and friends of Wille-Racine also helped by

contributing money, clothes, transportation and, some-times, simply a helping hand.

Whenever an obstacle appeared, Wille-Racine would take a deep breath and wait until, she said, God would work some magic.

“I always felt responsible to make something happen,” Wille-Racine said. “She was just looking to me for all the answers, and half the time I didn’t have them.”

Said Rocío: “Lisa, she always, always had hope.”

Blossoming in collegeCollege changed everything for Rocío.In high school, she’d often felt alone, invisible. At

Highlands, she realized there were many people like her — undocumented, fighting to attend college, working two or three jobs just to be able to go to school.

“I found a family,” she said.That newfound community helped her gain confi-

dence, to believe she could make a difference and give back to a society that had given her so much.

She joined student organizations that worked with immigration issues at local, state and national levels. They trained administrators about immigration laws, provided legal help to students applying for deferred status, pro-tested and lobbied for change, traveled to conferences to educate themselves about undocumented issues in other states.

In November 2013, Rocío traveled to Washington, D.C., with a student organization to lobby for immigration reform. The group staged a mock Thanksgiving dinner in the early morning hours in front of House Speaker John Boehner’s house to show how the holiday would be sad for children separated from families because of deportation. Then students headed to the Capitol to talk to senators and protest for immigration change.

“I’ve become an activist,” Rocío said. “I’ve become a fighter for my undocumented community. I’ve become a person unafraid …”

The opportunities that college has provided her, Rocío said, solidified her willingness to step into the open de-spite possible legal consequences.

“I’m still insecure in this country,” she said. “They can deport me any time. But we have to make a difference. If we are afraid, nothing is going to happen and we will be the same — invisible people living here. If we the students don’t make the change, nobody is going to make it for us.”

She is proud of what she’s accomplished, particularly that she’s set a path for others to follow. Two brothers, also undocumented, are also at Highlands.

“I don’t know how to describe how I feel,” Rocío said. “I just feel special, lucky to go to college, to be the first person in my family to finish high school, to finish college. It makes me feel I should work even more.”

Last spring, her sister Miriam, who graduates from high school in May, wrote this for her high school publication:

“My sister, Rocío, is my hero, because when my parents had to come to the United States to work to be able to … buy what we needed, she was 15 years old. She took care of me, my sister and two brothers, and she had to go to school, too … When we moved here … a lot of people would tell her she wouldn’t go further in school because she didn’t understand English. But … she never gives up. Now, she is almost done with college.”

On Dec. 12, Rocío received her degree in Spanish with a minor in Native American-Hispano studies. She would like to pursue a master’s in education in curriculum and instruction.

She would like to teach.But she can’t — she doesn’t have a Social Security num-

ber or a work permit.So she waits. And hopes.And continues to look into her heart for the truth she

has carried with her always: “Education is the only key to success.”

Ann Macari Healey’s column about people, places and is-sues of everyday life appears every other week. Her column earned first place in the 2013 Colorado Press Association Better Newspaper contest. She can be reached at [emailprotected] or 303-566-4110.

THE PRESIDENT’S ACTION

On Nov. 20, President Obama an-nounced an executive immigration or-der to create a program that would al-low 4 million to 5 million immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally to apply to work legally — as long as they have no criminal record, have lived in the U.S. for at least �ve years and have children. They could also qualify to become eligible for Medicare and So-cial Security.

The executive action also revises the 2012 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals by allowing children brought here illegally before 2010 to stay — previously, the year was 2007. It also removes the 30-year-old upper age limit and extends the two-year relief from deportation to three years. Un-der DACA, anyone with deferred ac-tion can apply for a work permit.

To qualify, children must:• Have come to the U.S. before their

16th birthday• Have continuously lived in the U.S.

since Jan. 1, 2010• Be in school, have graduated from

high school, obtained a GED, or have been honorably discharged from the armed forces

• Have not been convicted of a felony or serious misdemeanors

The DREAM Act, which Congress still has not passed, is bipartisan legisla-tion that would permit certain immi-grant students who have grown up in the U.S. to apply for temporary legal status, and eventually permanent legal status, and become eligible for U.S. citizenship if they attend college or serve in the military. It would ap-ply to most students who came here at age 15 or younger, have lived here continuously at least �ve years be-fore the bill’s enactment and have no criminal record.

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Duncan-Green to stage passion playBy Pat [emailprotected]

Gwen Duncan-Green does not give up. Five years after being struck by thoughts of writing a play about the passion of Je-sus, she’s closer to seeing a performance produced.

She almost gave up, overwhelmed by

the idea of writing, casting and producing a play based on a biblical story. “For two years, boom boom, the thoughts just kept coming, so I thought, `okay, I’ll do it,’” she said.

Founder of the Ute Pass Family The-atre, now the Pikes Peak Regional Theatre, Duncan-Green has staged many perfor-mances in the area. But this one seemed daunting at first.

Driven by a desire to see the play per-formed, however, Duncan-Green has completed the script and scheduled the Ute Pass Cultural Center for the first week-end in March. “I need actors, musicians, singers,” she said. “The play is written for children; I knew that adults who would come to see the play would know the story, but I’m not sure about the children.”

The script follows the bible as closely as

possible, she said. “My goal is for the chil-dren to understand the life of Jesus and to know and love Him and for a renewal of love and faith for the adults and to honor and glorify God and His son, Jesus Christ,” she said.

Recently, the playwright hired Seraiah Carol to direct the performance. For an audition, call Duncan-Green at 684-2513.

AREA CLUBSDOLL LOVERS of Teller County are invited to meetings at 10:30 a.m. the �rst Thursday of every month at the Village at Skyline. It’s free. A variety of programs include the study of antiques, and vintage and modern dolls. Everyone older than age 12 is welcome. Call Nancy at 719-390-8098.

FLORISSANT GRANGE No. 420 meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month. The grange continues to o�er the Florissant Jammers every Thursday for a potluck dinner at 6 p.m. followed by the music of the great Jammers until 9 p.m. All are welcome to come to the Grange. Call 719-748-0358.

THE FLORISSANT Library Book Club welcomes all book readers to its group. It meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Wednes-day of the month. Call 719-748-3939.

GOLD CAMP Victorian Society is dedicated to the preserva-tion of the history of Cripple Creek and the surrounding area. The Society plays a role in Cripple Creek’s historic events, celebrations, and festivals, including Donkey Derby Days, the Gold Camp Christmas, the Mt. Pisgah Speaks cemetery tour, the Salute To American Veterans, and many others. The Gold Camp Victorian Society also supports events in other com-munities in Teller County. The Society also sponsors a Victorian ball as well as a Victorian tea each year, both of which are open to members and non-members alike. Gold Camp Victorian Society members can be seen dressed in period attire welcoming visitors to Cripple Creek on Saturday afternoons during the summer months. The Society also includes the “Smokin’s Guns” club which presents historically-based skits and other entertainment during local events and festivals. The Gold Camp Victorian Society meets on the fourth Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. in the Centennial Building in Cripple Creek. Persons interested in participating as members of the Gold Camp Victorian Society are encouraged to call 689-0907 for more information.

GUITAR, VOCALS Ted Newman entertains with his guitar and vocals from 5:30-8:30 p.m. every Thursday, Saturday and Sunday at The Pantry in Green Mountain Falls. Call 719-684-9018 for details and reservations.

HELP U Club meets the third Thursday of every month. Pot luck at noon and meeting at 1 p.m. We help people and other nonpro�ts in Teller County and the Lake George area of Park County. Meetings are at the Lake George Community Center. Information: Joan 719-689-2486 or Help U Club, 1054 High Chateau Road, Florissant, CO 80816.

ITALIAN CLUB If you love family, socializing and culture, then membership in Sons of Italy is right for you. Member-ship is open to men and women. More information at www.sono�talypp.com.

JOIN US to knit, crochet or craft every Monday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Bring your projects. Meet new and old friends. Instruc-tions are provided for free. Meeting are at Cripple Creek Co�ee at Aspen Mine Center.

KIWANIS CLUB of Ute Pass/Woodland Park meets at 6:45 a.m. Wednesdays at Denny’s. Call 719-687-5534. Kiwanis is a global organization of volunteers dedicated to changing the world, one child and one community at a time.

THE LADIES of the Veterans of Foreign Wars meets at noon, the second Tuesday of each month at the Woodland Park Public Library. Call 719-687-9157.

LAKE GEORGE Fire Protection District Auxiliary meetings are at 6 p.m. the �rst Tuesday of the month at Station No. 1 at the corner of Hwy. 24 and County Road 90.

THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club meets the second Saturday of every month at 10 a.m. at the Lake George Com-munity Center. Mineral topics will be discussed but no �eld trips until spring. Call 719-748-3861.

MODA U meets at 1 p.m. at Nuts ‘n Bolts Needleworks, 200 S. Chestnut, Woodland Park. Quilters from novice to professional share their craft and get all the latest info about fabrics and notions. Call 719-687-2272.

THE MOUNTAIN Artists meets from 9-10:30 a.m. the second Saturday of each month at the Ute Pass Cultural Center in Woodland Park. Call 719-687-1374 or visit www.TheMoun-tainArtists.com. The nonpro�t group was established to promote, encourage and support the making and showing of visual arts in Teller County-Ute Pass area.

MOPS, MOTHERS of Preschoolers in Woodland Park, meets from 8:45-11:30 a.m two Tuesdays a month, from September to May. All mothers of children pre-birth through kindergarten are invited to join. Meetings include guest speakers, social time and creative activities. Child care is included. Register anytime online at www.utepassmops.org or call 719-687-4812.

MUSIC LESSONS. Guitar, drums and general music lessons are now o�ered on Friday mornings at the Florissant Grange, 2009 County Road 31. Call 719-748-0358.

THE TIMBERLINE Artists meet at 10 a.m. every Wednesday of each month, upstairs at the Aspen Mine Senior Center in Cripple Creek. Everyone is welcome. Bring your favorite craft or art medium and join a dedicated group.

PARK AND Teller County potluck Just Folks Luncheon is at noon every third Wednesday at Lake George Community Center, 39141 US HWY 24. Call 719-689-0554.

PIKES PEAK Community Club meets starting at 6:30 p.m. with a potluck supper the second Thursday of each month at the Pikes Peak Community Center in Divide. Supper is followed by a business meeting. The public is welcome to attend.

PIKES PEAK Lions Club meets at 6:30 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday in Woodland Park. Call 719-684-3081. The Pikes Peak Lions Club is part of Lions Club International, which is the largest worldwide service organization in the world. Our annual fundraiser is the annual Donkey Basketball Tourna-ment. Our fundraisers and service projects provide support for our local community through work projects ranging from testing preschool age kids eyes for eye disease to sponsoring special needs kids to our local Lions Camp in Woodland Park.

PIKES PEAK Plein Air Painters is a nationally recognized group of regional artists. Join the group for year-round activi-ties, painting on location, social activities pertaining to visual arts and art shows. The group is open to anyone intersted in learning to paint or improving their painting skills. Go to www.thepikespeakpleinairpainters.com, or contact Kenneth Shanika at 303-647-1085 or [emailprotected].

PIKES PEAK Rotary meets at 7 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, south entrance. Rotary is a worldwide organiza-tion working on projects ranging from polio eradication internationally to bell ringing for the Salvation Army locally. Call 719-687-3611.

QUILT MINISTRIES meets between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. the third Thursday of each month at Ute Pass Cultural Center to make quilts for families that have been burned out of their homes or are in need for some other reason. The quilts are simple, machine pieced and hand-tied and are excellent projects for both new and more experienced quilters. No sewing skills necessary. Participants are encour-aged to bring their own sewing machines but machines also will be available onsite. Volunteers who don’t want to sew can still serve as cutters and pressers. This is a nondenominational group. Call 719-687-6828.

QUILTERS ABOVE the Clouds is a quilting guild for all levels. The guild meets from 1-5 p.m. the fourth Friday of the month at Mountain View United Methodist Church in Woodland Park to share quilting experiences and exchange ideas. The group also participates in projects to bene�t charity organizations.

RAMPART ROCK `n’ Jazz Retro Jammers (RJs) singers rehearse Saturday afternoons in Woodland Park. Rock, soul, jazz, blues; soprano, alto, tenor, and bass vocalists welcome in addition to keyboard or instrumental accompanists. Call 686-8228 for directions or visit www.rampartrocknjazz.com.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN Chapter, 1st Cavalry Division Meeting is at 9 a.m. the second Saturday of every month at the Retired Enlisted Association, 834 Emory Circle, Colorado Springs.We area non-political,nonpro�t soldier’s and veteran’s fraternity.Anyone who has been assigned or attached to the 1st Cavalry Division anytime, anywhere, is eligible for membership. Friends of the Cav who have not served with the Division are eligible for Associate membership. We are family orientated so please bring signi�cant other. We participate in local parades, do food shelf, picnics, Christmas party. Come join us for great camaraderie,make new friends, possibly meet old friends from theFirst Team. Contact Paul at 719-687-1169 or Al at 719-689-5778.

SECOND SUNDAY Scribes is for writers, wannabe writers and all those who love the written word. Sponsored by the Cripple Creek Park and Recreation Department the group meets at 2 p.m. the second Sunday of the month at the Ben-nett Avenue Park and Rec center. Call 719-689-3514.

THE SNOWFLAKE Chapter No. 153 Order of the Eastern Star meets at 7:30 p.m. at 205 Park St. in Woodland Park. Call 719-687-9800.

SOUTH PARK Toastmasters Club meets every Thursday except the �rst Thursday of the month at the Fire Station in Gu�ey. Social time is at 6:30 p.m. with meetings starting promptly at 7 p.m.Visitors are welcome.Call 719-661-3913 or email [emailprotected].

TELLER COUNTY Knitters meets from 10 a.m. to noon every Saturday. The �rst and third Saturdays are at Nikki’s Knots, 101 Boundary, Woodland Park; and the second and fourth Saturdays are at the Community Partnership o�ce in Divide (located above McGinty’s Wood Oven Pub; parking and entrance on the north side). Yarn fans of all skills and types are welcome for a chance to share projects and conversation. For more details and plans for �fth Saturdays, check Teller Knitters on Ravelry.com.

THE TELLER County Sport Horse Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month. Call Grace at 719-661-8497 for more information.

TELLER COUNTY Search and Rescue is an all-volunteer, nonpro�t organization whose mission is to locate and rescue lost and missing people in Teller County and the surrounding area. Our general membership meetings are at 7 p.m. the �rst Monday of every month at the Woodland Park Library, downstairs meeting room. Although we are not accepting new members at this time, the public is invited to our meetings. We are available to give hiking safety presentations to schools, churches or local organizations and we do accept donations. For further information, please contact Janet Bennett at 719-306-0826.

THOMAS V. Kelly VFW Post 6051 meets at at 7 p.m. the �rst Wednesday of each month at Veterans Hall, 27637 Hwy 67, Woodland Park, CO 80863, the old Woodland Park Grange Hall where Eric V. Dickson American Legion Post #1980 meets.

UTE PASS Historical Society self-guided tours of History Park are from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday of each month from June to September. Tours are free and start at the Museum Center, 231 E. Henrietta Ave., next to the Woodland Park Public Library, and docents will be on hand at each building to answer questions. A guided historic walking tour of Woodland Park meets at 10:30 a.m. Donations accepted for tours. Contact 729-686-7512 or www.utepasshistoricalsociety.org. All tours are weather permitting.

UTE PASS Historical Society board of directors meets at 5:30 p.m. the second Monday of each month at the Museum Center, 231 E. Henrietta Ave., next to the library. All patrons and members of the public are invited. Call 719-686-7512 for information.

UTE PASS Masonic Lodge 188 meets at 7:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of the month. Call 719-687-9453.

UTE PASS Social Club is open to ladies of all ages and interests. The club has many activities to pick and choose from including bridge, hiking, luncheons, mahjongg, crafts, needle works, and much more. Call president Florence Cooper at 719-687-3893 or visit http://sites.google.com/site/upsocial/.

VICTOR HERITAGE Society is a volunteer, nonpro�t organization devoted to preserving the hardrock gold mining heritage and the experience of living in Victor, Colorado during the late 19th and early 20th century. For information on meetings, activities and sponsored events, visit www.VictorHeritageSociety.com or e-mail [emailprotected].

WRITE-NOW, A writers’ group in Cripple Creek, is open to all writers, all genres, aspiring and accomplished, who wish to hone their craft. Bring �ve copies of up to three double-spaced pages of writing you are working on and a pen to the �rst meeting. We will get right to work after guidelines are discussed. This is a critique group, which means everyone will have constructive input on each other’s writing. A wide variety of input and discussion always helps everyone with their writing. Meetings are at 7 p.m. every other Tuesday at Cripple Creek-Victor Junior/Senior High School Board Room. Questions? Call 719-648-8795.

WOODLAND PARK Book Club meets at 10:30 a.m. the �rst Tuesday of each month in the third �oor board room at thse Woodland Park Public Library. Call 719-687-9281 ext. 103 for book titles and information.

WOODLAND PARK Community Singers rehearse from 7-8:30 p.m. Mondays at Mountain View United Methodist Church at 1101 Rampart Range Road in Woodland Park. No tryout needed. Just come and sing. Call 719-687-8545.

Continued from Page 15

Clubs continues on Page 21

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18 Pikes Peak Courier December 17, 2014

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785 Gold Hill PlaceWoodland Park CO/ Above City Market

719-629-8577

Meeting Times:10:30 a.m. Sundays

Hope & Grace MinistriesCowboys for Christ

UN

ITED

C

HURCH OF CHR

IST

TH

AT

THEY M AY ALL B

E ON

E

Church in the Wildwood

United Church of Christ

Adult Sunday School9:00 AM

Worship 10:00 AM

Children’s Sunday SchoolDuring Worship

Nursery CareProvided

684-9427www.church-in-the-wildwood.org

10585 Ute Pass Ave.Green Mountain Falls

Rev. David Shaw, Pastor

Sunday School 9:30 AM

(Both Adults & Children)

Worship 10:30 AM Sunday 7:00pM Tuesday

Children’s Sunday School (During Worship)

Nursery Care provided

UN

ITED

C

HURCH OF CHR

IST

TH

AT

THEY M AY ALL B

E ON

E

Church in the Wildwood

United Church of Christ

Adult Sunday School9:00 AM

Worship 10:00 AM

Children’s Sunday SchoolDuring Worship

Nursery CareProvided

684-9427www.church-in-the-wildwood.org

10585 Ute Pass Ave.Green Mountain Falls

Rev. David Shaw, Pastor

Woodland ParkChurch of Christ

Worship ServiceSunday MorningBible Class 10 am

Worship Service11am

Wednesday BibleClass 7pm

816 Browning Ave. & BurdetteCall: 687-2323 or 687-6311

{ {{ {{ {

Grace Church of Lake George

39141 US HWY 24Lake George, CO 80816Lake George Community Center

719-377-8490

Sunday Worship - 10:00 am

Worship ServicesWednesday 7:00 p.m.

Sundays 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.Sunday School 9:15 a.m.

Adult Bible Study 9:15 a.m.

1310 Evergreen Heights Dr.Woodland Park719-687-2303

www.faithteller.orgfaithpreschoolteller.org

SUNDAYWORSHIPSERVICES

9:30am OR 11am

27400 North Hwy 67 • Woodland Park(2.6 miles from Hwy 24 across from Shining Mountain Golf Course)

719.687.3755www.impactchristian.net

THE LIGHTA Spirit Filled Ministry

213 Aspen Garden Way Unit 3Woodland Park, CO 80863

[emailprotected]

SERVICE TIMESSunday Service – 12 pm

Wednesday Night Bible Study 7pm

Highland Bible ChurchMeeting at Tamarac Center

331-4903Sunday School – 8:50 am

Worship – 10:00 amwww.highlandbiblechurch.org

Mountain ViewUnited Methodist Church

1101 Rampart Range RoadWoodland Park • 719 687-3868

Sunday Worship 10:30 am

www.mt-viewumc.org

Please join us in worshipping our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ,

on Sunday, at the

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saintslocated at 785 Apache Trail, Woodland Park, Colorado

at 10 a.m.Phone – (719) 472-4609

www.Mormon.org

Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved

To advertise your place of worship in this section,

call 303-566-4091 or [emailprotected]

Experiencing God’s Radical Love &

Sharing it with OthersEncounter Service

Sundays @ 10:00 a.m.Kids Ministry Available

107 West Henrietta Ave.Woodland Park, CO 80863

(719) 687-7626

www.prayermountainco.com

VA catches heat for hospital dispute Congressional delegation blasts agency’s actions By Vic Vela [emailprotected]

Colorado’s congressional delegation last week blasted the Department of Veter-ans Affairs for its handling of a construc-tion contract dispute that has further de-layed the building of a new VA hospital and has left hundreds of workers in limbo.

A fast-moving news cycle began on Dec. 10, when a federal civilian board of appeals ruled that the VA was in breach of contract with the group it hired to build a state-of-the-art veterans hospital in Aurora.

The contract dispute was over money. The contractor, Kiewit-Turner, claimed

it could not fi nish work on the project at the price tag that the VA had originally set, which was $582.8 million. Kiewit-Turner said it would take about $1 billion to fi nish the work.

The Civilian Court of Contract Appeals ruled in favor of Kiewit-Turner, which re-sulted in the contractor abruptly stopping work at the site, located at Interstate 225 and Colfax Avenue. About 1,400 construc-tion workers were employed at the site.

“Where we are right now is really un-fortunate,” Republican Congressman Mike Coffman told Colorado Community Me-dia. Coffman’s 6th Congressional District includes Aurora.

“Workers lost their jobs right before the holidays and it’s unfortunate for taxpay-ers who foot the bill and the veterans who earned health-care benefi ts that this hos-pital is needed to deliver.”

The day after the appeals board ruling was handed down, Coffman and every other member of Colorado’s congressio-nal delegation attached their signatures to a letter to VA offi cials and higher-ups at Kiewit-Turner, urging the two to come to-gether to fi nd a solution.

“We are deeply concerned about this situation and urge VA and KT to immedi-ately negotiate a path forward for this proj-ect,” the letter reads.

In the letter, the elected offi cials urged, “in the strongest terms possible,” for the negotiations to result in a modifi ed con-tract that will allow construction to contin-ue for 60 days while a long-term contract is worked out.

Any long-term contract will be handled by the Army Corps of Engineers, rather than the VA. That’s because on Dec. 11, the VA agreed to hand over construction over-

sight on the Aurora project to the Corps.The next day, Coffman announced that

he will introduce legislation to strip away the VA’s authority to manage all future con-struction projects.

Coffman cited a Government Account-ability Offi ce report that shows VA projects in four cities, including Aurora, to be hun-dreds of millions of dollars over budget and almost three years behind schedule.

“Really, this is a pattern of total mis-management by the VA in major construc-tion projects,” Coffman said.

Democratic Congressman Ed Perlmut-ter said in an emailed statement that the VA wanted a $1 billion medical center, but “the project was never redesigned to fi t” the near-$600 million contract budget.

“There has been a serious dispute be-tween the VA and the prime contractor for too long,” Perlmutter said.

The Business Buzz features news about the economic scene, promotions, acquisi-tions and expansions. Contact Pat Hill at [emailprotected] or 686-6458.

Pikes Peak Wildfi re Preven-tion Partners have selected

Camp Elim north of Woodland Park for the Spring workshop. Registration for the workshop opened Dec. 1.

For more information, check ppwpp.org.

Welcome Home, Warrior, a nonprofi t organization, features Christmas cards as a benefi t for

the Mighty Moms, whose sons and daughters are in Walter Reed Hospital.

In addition to purchasing the cards to send, donors may make a donation in the name of a friend or relative, in lieu of a gift. For information, call 687-6542.

Pikes Peak Regional Hospital hosted a holiday luncheon Dec. 11 for members of the Senior Circle. In addition to lunch, the seniors bid farewell to Karen Earley, who coordinates the events for the Senior Circle. Photos by Pat Hill

Karen Earley, left, hosted her � nal function for Pikes Peak Regional Hospital’s Senior Circle Dec. 11 at the Ute Pass Cultural Center. Earley is leaving her post to take a job as the activity director for Medalion, a senior-living fa-cility that includes residences for independent, assisted-living and skilled-nursing needs. Medlaion was recently purchase by Centura Health.

BUSINESS BUZZ

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Pikes Peak Courier 19 December 17, 2014

19-Calendar

Couple seek daylight time throughout yearFederal law is hurdle in quest for brighter winter eveningsBy Vic [emailprotected]

There could be good news afoot for the morning grouches among us who bemoan the hour of sleep we lose when we change the clock each spring.

Rather than adjusting and re-adjusting to changing clocks, a Lakewood couple seeks to do away with the bi-annual tradi-tion of the springing forward and falling back of time by making Mountain Daylight Time a permanent fixture in Colorado.

Sean and Teri Johnson have filed paper-work with the state in an effort to pursue a ballot measure that would make switching clocks twice a year a thing of the past.

“I had a client tell me that if I don’t like it I should do something about it. So I did,” said Sean Johnson, who runs his own per-

sonal trainer business.The Johnsons’ measure would mean

that the clock we set during the second Sunday in March would be our year-round time zone, thus doing away with falling back to Mountain Standard Time on the first Sunday of each November.

“I have a lot of clients and friends and family who are and who have always been sick of the ridiculous early sunsets in the winter,” he said.

Johnson cites an American Psycho-logical Association study that showed how workplace issues come about during time-change periods, such as missed appoint-ments, employees showing up late and workplace injuries that occur due to a lack of sleep.

He also said the time change in Novem-ber is hard on road construction crews who often have to set up traffic cones dur-ing dark rush-hour periods in the winter.

“A lot of them are fearing for their lives because it’s pitch black while they’re doing

this,” he said.Others say people with special needs

are impacted by time changes. Kristine McAllister of Pueblo has a 24-year-old daughter with a seizure disorder who must take her medication at specific times of the day.

“It wreaks havoc on our lives every six months,” McAllister said. “She’s non-verbal and her cognitive abilities are de-creased. You can’t explain to her that you get to sleep in an hour or have to get up early, because she doesn’t get that.”

“She couldn’t care less what the clock says. She can’t change what her body is telling her, so she gets very angry because she doesn’t understand.”

The Johnsons have a lot of work to do before voters could even weigh in on the measure in 2016. In order to qualify for the ballot, they would have to collect 86,105 valid signatures of registered voters.

Also, a similar effort failed in the Legis-lature in 2011.

And the Johnsons may be facing an up-hill legal battle. Language in the federal Uniform Time Act indicates that Colorado may not be able to switch to a permanent Mountain Daylight Time zone.

Johnson said he is aware of the law and has been communicating with lawyers about the possible hurdle.

“I’m not sure about what the strategy is going to be, but I don’t think it’s going to be an issue,” he said.

But Johnson said recent press cover-age has resulted in him being contacted by people from all over the state who say they support his effort and who say they will volunteer to collect signatures. John-son also has set up a website: stopthe-timechanges.com.

“A lot of people want a longer evening to walk their dog and to be able to attend after-school sports and activities,” he said. “That’s what I’ve heard the most — real, personal reasons and the effects on fami-lies.”

Parade is a hitThe Lighter Side of Christmas parade, with its Beatlemania theme

was a hit with the Woodland Park community. The committee works nearly all year long to ensure the parade goes off the first Saturday night in December without a hitch.

Anticipation is half the fun of a holiday parade, at least it looks like that for the Girls Scouts waiting for the fun to begin. Photo by Ken Wyatt

A stop at the Hospitality House to enjoy cookies, cider and hot chocolate was a vital part of the Tweeds Holiday Home Tour Dec. 6. The house is the former site of the Woodland Park library and is now the o�ces of True West realty. Photo by Pat Hill

The city of Woodland Park added to the illumination of the Lighter Side of Christmas parade. From observations along the avenue, more people attended this parade than any other, enhanced attendance probably due to the mild weather Dec. 6. Photo by Ken Wyatt

Pikes Peak Regional Hospital won the prize for the best �oat in the Lighter Side of Christmas parade Dec. 6. Photo by Ken Wyatt

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Xcel Energy believes that solar energy is a big part of a clean energy future.

But to bring the greatest benefits of solar to the greatest number of people, we have to do it right.

Using the same dedication to renewable energy that made us the number one wind utility in the nation, Xcel Energy is working to develop and support large-scale solar projects that deliver clean, renewable solar energy at a lower cost.

A clean energy future to build on. A strong energy grid to depend on. Xcel Energy believes our customers deserve both.

WE BELIEVE IN SOLAR ENERGY.

IN A BIG WAY.IN THE RIGHT WAY.

xcelenergy.com/ResponsibleSolar © 2014 Xcel Energy Inc.

13-XCLOOS-00573-D_SOLAR_RightWay_10.25x8.5_FNL.indd 1 11/10/14 9:04 AM

Celebrating the season

The Woodland Park Middle School celebrated the season with performances Dec. 9 for the school district’s elementary school. As well, the middle school’s Odys-sey Choir performed a special for Summit Elementary School.

Woodland Park Middle School band and choir students performed for Columbine, Gateway, and Summit Elementary schools during their day-long Holiday Concert Tour on Dec. 9. Pictured is the percussion section beating on trash cans as part of their band performance. Courtesy photos

Woodland Park Middle School’s Odyssey Choir performed last week at Summit Elementary School.

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Pikes Peak Courier 21 December 17, 2014

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God’s Message brings Hope, Joy, Love and Life!

Go to: www.wordoflife.worldbibleschool.org

Learn in your home, at your pace, with “pen-pal” helpers and online friends – with no one knocking on your door.

God’s Message brings Hope, Joy, Love, and Life!

Use promo code: ADCLASS1

Go to: worldbibleschool.org

Sponsored by: Woodland Park Church of Christ

God has spoken!God reveals Himself and His will for you-for all of us-in the Bible! What does God say about Himself? How does God really speak to man today! Who is the Holy Spirit? How can I be “right with God”? Learn online in your own home for FREE! Starting is just a click away!

It’s a tuba Christmas

Four middle-school students partici-pated in the 25th annual Tuba Christmas event last week. The four were among 113 participants from schools around the area.

Woodland Park Middle School band teacher, Katy Simpson, along with four of her students, participated in Tuba Christmas in Colorado Springs last week. With 113 participants from around the area, this was the 25th year of thelocal event and the 40th year of the event held nationwide. From left, Jackson Schubloom, Greg Pappadakis, Cameron Vela, Simpson and Philip Walenta. Courtesy photos

Known locally for his musical prowess, Ted on the Tuba.

AREA CLUBSWOODLAND PARK High School Panther Pride Athletic Boosters meets at 6:30 p.m. the �rst Wednesday of each month in the high school library.

WOODLAND PARK Holistic Luncheon is o�ered at noon the second Wednesday of each month. Contact Jim at 719-687-4335 for location. This is a free group, often potluck style lunch.

WOODLAND PARK Senior Citizens Club hosts the Golden Circle daily hot lunch at 11:45 a.m. Monday through Friday, except for the 2nd Tuesday Potluck and the 4th Tuesday Catered Lunch, both with entertainment or an educational presentation. Pool on Tuesday morning, cribbage, euchre or dominoes most mornings, bridge right after lunch on Mondays and Wednesdays, exercise for arthritis Wednesday and Friday mornings and a host of other activities. Monthly All You Can Eat Pancake Breakfast every 3rd Saturday helps raise funds for Senior Center activities. Contact the activities coordinator at 719-687-3877 to �nd out more or to receive a monthly newsletter.

SUPPORT

AA MEETS from noon to 1 p.m. and 6-7 p.m. every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, and from 5-6 p.m. every Saturday, and from noon to 1 p.m. and 6-7 p.m. every Sunday at 10400 Ute Pass Ave. in Green Mountain Falls.

AA MEETING is from 7-8 p.m. Thursdays at Woodland Park Community Church. This is a Beginners Book Study meeting.

AA MEETS at 8 p.m. Wednesdays at Living Springs Church, 108 N. Park St., Wood-land Park.

AA LATE Night Meeting is at 8 p.m. Wednesdays, downstairs at Faith Lutheran Church, 1310 Evergreen Heights, Woodland Park. Enter through the back door on the north side.

AL-ANON ABOVE the Clouds is now meeting at the People’s Bank in Woodland Park at Hwy 24 and Sheridan Ave., rear entrance Mondays at 5:45-6:45 p.m. Handicap accessible.

AL-ANON MEETS at noon Thursdays in Gu�ey next to the post o�ce. Call 719-689-5808.

AL-ANON MEETS from 7-8 p.m. Thursdays at the Woodland Park Community Church. 800 Valley View Dr. Ste. D in Woodland Park

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets from 9-10 a.m. every Sunday at the VFW, three and a half miles north of Woodland Park on Colo. 67.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, AA, has a 4 p.m. discussion group every Sunday at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Cripple Creek.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets for 12-steps Bible discussion at 6 p.m. every Monday at the Aspen Mine Center in Cripple Creek. This meeting is open to AA members and the general public. An AA meeting follows at 7 p.m.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. every Monday and at 5 p.m. Satur-days at the Community Partnership Family Resource Center in Divide.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS for women meets from 5:30-6:30 p.m. and from men from 7-8 p.m. every Tuesday at the Ute Pass Cultural Center in Woodland Park.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Hilltop AA, meets at 7 p.m. Tuesdays and at 2 p.m. Saturdays at the Cripple Creek Rehab & Wellness Center on North Street.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. Wednesdays at the Victor Community Center on Second and Portland.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets from noon to 1 p.m. every Thursday at the Nazarene Church, 750 N. Colo. 67, at the corner of Colo. 67 and Evergreen Heights.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. Fridays at the Lake George Com-munity Center.

ADULT CHILD Alcoholics Anonymous meets at 7 p.m. Fridays. For meeting location check out www.adultchildren.org. The group no longer meets at the Victor Com-munity Center.

ALATEEN ABOVE the Clouds meets at the People’s Bank in Woodland Park at Hwy 24 and Sheridan Ave., rear entrance Mondays at 5:45-6:45 p.m. Handicap accessible. For more info call 719-632-0063

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION Family Caregiver Support Group meets from 4:30-5:30 p.m. the �rst Tuesday of every month at the Woodland Park Public Library, in the board room on the third �oor. Group is for caregivers, family, and friends who deal with the daily challenges of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias - at home, in a facility setting, or from long distance. Support and encouragement is o�ered in a con�dential setting at no cost. Meet other caregivers and learn more about the disease, caregiving issues and share suggestions on how to take care of yourself and your loved one. For more information, contact the Alzheimer’s Association at 719-266-8773 or Paula Levy at 719-331-3640.

COMPUTER CLASSES are o�ered for free at the Florissant Library. You can take Computer Basics, Word I, Word II, Excel, and PowerPoint. To register for a class, or for information and a schedule, call 719-748-3939.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Education Program, an educational and support group where victims of domestic violence can learn more about power and control issues and the cycle of violence, meets at 1:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Our Lady of the Woods Church in Woodland Park. Call Devra at 719-243-5508 or e-mail [emailprotected].

EARLY INTERVENTION Colorado - The Resource Exchange o�ers free playgroups call Nicol Houghland at 719-233-5873. Also provides developmental supports and services to children birth through 3 years of age, who have special developmental needs. For free developmental screening call 719-687-5047 or visit www.tre.org

GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. Sundays at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Cripple Creek.

GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. every Tuesday at Woodland Park Com-munity Church O�ces, Suite A, 700 Valley View Drive in Woodland Park.

GED, ADULT basic education classes are from 3-6 p.m. Tuesdays in the Aspen Mine Center, Cripple Creek. Free childcare provided. Open enrollment. Call 719-686-0705. Sponsored by Community Partnership Family Resource Center.

GED/ESL CLASSES are from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays in Divide with open enrollment. Free childcare is provided. Call 719-686-0705 for more information. Sponsored by Community Partnership Family Resource Center.

TO HELP local families better prepare for an emergency, the local Home Instead Se-nior Care o�ce has a Web site containing downloadable materials such as a checklist of important contact names and information, a medication tracker, allergies/condi-tions worksheet and a wallet card to carry when away from home. These materials also can be accessed and downloaded at www.senioremergencykit.com. Contact the local Home Instead Senior Care o�ce at 719-534-3064 for more information.

LA LECHE League, for breastfeeding help and information before and after baby comes. Call Kathleen, the Teller County area leader, at 719-687-1164.

LITTLE CHAPEL Food Pantry, 69 County Road 5, Divide, is in search of volunteers to help distribute food to its clients. Any help with paper work, loading cars or packing boxes is greatly needed. Distribution days are the second and fourth Mondays of the month. Volunteer times are from 1-7 p.m. Client food pick-up times are from 4:30- 6:30 p.m. Call Little Chapel Food Pantry at 719-322-7610 or visit littlechapel-foodpantry.org.

LIVING LIFE on Life’ Terms, a recovery group, meets at 5 p.m. every Thursday. Call 719-687-9644 or 719-687-1054 for meeting location.

MONTHLY COMMODITIES food distribution program. Last Friday of each month at the Aspen Mine Center, 166 East Bennett Avenue, Cripple Creek. Proof of Teller County residence and income requirements must be met to participate. Call 689-3584 for more information.

A MULTIPLE Sclerosis support group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon on the second Thursday of each month at the Woodland Park Library. Call Annette at 719-687-4103.

NARCONON REMINDS families that abuse of addictive pharmaceutical drugs is on the rise. Learn to recognize the signs of drug abuse and get your loved ones help if

they are at risk. Call Narconon for a free brochure on the signs addiction for all types of drugs. Narconon also o�ers free assessments and referrals. Call 800-431-1754 or go to DrugAbuseSolution.com. Narconon also can help with addiction counseling. Call for free assessments or referrals, 800-431-1754.

NEW BEGINNINGS with Food workshop graduates meet every third Sunday of the month to provide ongoing support for overcoming health and weight issues and exchanging ideas and inspirations. For location and more information, contact Barbara Royal at 719-687-6823.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS 12-step program group meets from 5:30-6 p.m. every Thursday at Mountain View United Methodist Church in Woodland Park. Call 719-687-0246 or 719-475-0037.

PARENTS AS Teachers and Bright Beginnings home visits available. Please call Community Partnership at 686-0705 to schedule a free visit for your newborn or young child.

PARENT EDUCATION Workshops for parents with children ages 1 through teens. Workshops provided throughout the year at Community Partnership in Divide. Childcare and meals included. Call 686-0705 for session dates and times.

SENIOR CITIZENS Club, Woodland Park, is open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot lunch o�ered at 11:45 a.m. Monday through Friday; reservations required; cost is$2.25 for those 60 and up and $6.50 for all others. Bridge is from noon to 3 p.m. Monday and Wednesday. 2nd Tuesday is potluck and program. 4th Tuesday is catered meal and program. Exercise for Arthritis program of the Arthritis Foundation is from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Wednesday and Friday. Bingo and Tai Chi is from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Thursday.Membership is $20 per year and eligibility begins at 50 years of age. We love new members with new ideas. Contact phone is 719-687-3877.

SOUP KITCHEN is from noon to 1 p.m. Wednesdays at Woodland Park Community Church. All soups and breads are homemade, and the kitchen is open to anyone wanting a warm meal and some fellowship.

SUDDEN UNEXPECTED Infant Death Local Support Group. The group o�ers bereavement services for parents, families, friends and caregivers who have been a�ected by the sudden unexpected loss of an infant or toddler. There is no cost. The third Monday of the month from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Colorado Springs Penrose Library, 20 N. Cascade Ave. Adult meeting only; no child care will be provided. For additional help and information, call Angel Eyes at 888-285-7437 or visit angeleyes.org.

TRE’S CRIPPLE Creek playgroup meets 9-11 a.m. Fridays at the Aspen MIne Center in downtown Cripple Creek. Call Cathy 719-687-8054.

TELLER COUNTY Nonpro�t Roundtable, �rst Tuesday of every month from noon to 1 p.m. (bring your own lunch). Free support group for nonpro�ts, covering various topics decided by local nonpro�ts. Contact Debbie Upton at the City of Woodland Park, 687-5218 for locations and more information.

TELLER COUNTY Search and Rescue meets the �rst Monday of each month at the Woodland Park Library downstairs meeting room at 7 p.m. We are an all-volunteer, non-pro�t organization tasked with locating and rescuing lost and missing people in Teller County and the surrounding areas. Experience is not required as we conduct

Continued from Page 17

Clubs continues on Page 24

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801 West Cucharras St., Co. Springs, CO

475-7003, Fax: 447-1761Email: [emailprotected]

Library celebrates holidaysBy Pat [emailprotected]

The Woodland Park library celebrated the holiday season with gingerbread house made by people in the community, a feature sponsored by the Lighter Side of Christmas parade.

Adding to the festivities is the book tree decorated with titles aimed at every literary taste.

Entries in the gingerbread house contest, sponsored by the Lighter Side of Christmas parade committee, are on display at the Woodland Park library. Photos by Pat Hill

What better way to celebrate Christmas than a book tree at the Woodland Park library? The tree o�ers literary ideas for the season, for those with time in-between festivities and holiday shopping. Jennie Darrah, adult services librarian, is around to help patrons select a book – but probably not from the tree.

Jack selected as new Black Forest Fire ChiefBy Danny [emailprotected]

Monument native Bry-an Jack has been chosen as the new fire Chief of the Black Forest Fire/Rescue Protection District.

Jack was appointed by the District’s Fire Board

during its Dec. 10 regularly scheduled meeting. He will replace interim fire Chief James Rebitski, who was filling in for embattled fire Chief Bob Harvey.

The Board announced that Jack’s starting salary will be around $85,000. He is expected to sign his con-tract by the end of the year, and begin his new role as chief in January.

Rebitski will remain with the department as the deputy chief.

Jack brings a wealth of experience to the job. He was most recently the

Town Administrator in Simla from March through September of this year.

Prior to that he spent 10 years as the battalion chief for the Tri-Lakes Monu-ment Fire Protection Dis-trict, where his responsi-bilities included the daily operations of the 40-mem-ber department. His duties also included establishing and assuming incident command on major fire, medical, hazardous mate-rials, and rescue emergen-cies, as well as promoting and maintaining a positive working environment with

agency employees and ex-ternal parties.

He was the interim chief if the Tri-Lakes Monu-ment/Fire Protection Dis-trict from December 2012 through May 2013. While in that position he directed and oversaw the devel-opment and administra-tion of community based programs and initiatives through civic, school, busi-ness, and other organiza-tional groups.

Jack is also a former captain with the Tri-Lake Fire Protection District (April 2001 to August 2004).

He began his career as a firefighter with Tri-Lakes Protection District in 1995, as well as a five-year run as a Hotshot with the U.S. Forest Service.

The Black Forest Fire Board selected Jack after more than an hour in ex-ecutive session. After Jack was announced as the new chief, the crowd who gathered at Fire Station I applauded Rebitski for his work as interim chief.

Harvey had been em-broiled in a controversy with El Paso County Sheriff Terry Maketa within days

after the massive Black For-est Fire erupted on June 11, 2013.

Maketa was critical of Harvey’s handling of the fire, which eventually led to the former Black Forest Fire Board to hire an in-dependent investigator to look into Harvey’s handling of the situation. The inves-tigation cleared Harvey of any wrong-doing, but that led to even more heat from Maketa, local residents and the new fire board.

Jack continues on Page 24

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Pikes Peak Courier 23 December 17, 2014

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What Every Knee Arthritis Sufferer Should Know About This Often Successful Medical Treatment

The Advanced Medical Treatment Every Knee Arthritis Sufferer Needs To Know - Before Thinking About Knee Replacement Surgery

El Paso County - If you suffer with knee arthritis pain, you have probably already tried many treat-ments... especially count-less pain medications. Experienced doctors understand that, even though pain medications such as anti-inflammatory pain pills are part of the recommended early treat-ment plan for knee arthri-tis pain...they are rarely the answer. In most cases they have minimal results (if any) and have a laundry list of potential side effects. Some being serious and even life threatening.

Are There Any Better

Options? Thankfully, advance-ments in science and tech-nology come extremely fast. And now there is a very good option for knee arthritis to help relieve the pain. An option that a lot of knee arthritis suffer-ers have never heard of...and even worse... have not been properly informed about. Before we get into the actual treatment, please understand this... Osteo Relief Institute is a real medical clinic that has treated thousands of knee arthritis suffer-ers. Patients travel from all over the country to be treated at their clinic be-cause they want the best medical treatments avail-able. What you are about to discover is a REAL medi-cal treatment. Not a mira-cle cure you see on info-mercials or on the internet. Know this fact: There is no cure for arthritis. But there is this treatment that... when performed correctly and with the proper technology... has already helped thousands

Advanced Imaging Allows Doctors To Pin-Point Treatments And Relieve Knee Arthritis Pain

Science rescues knee arthritis sufferers? Research shows joint injections done without advanced imaging misses the joint about 30% of the time. Now doctors can put lubricating fluid directly into the arthritic joint that may alleviate pain and restore function to many.

HOW IT WORKS: With The Proper Advanced Imaging And Technology Joint Cushioning and Lubricating Medication is Placed Precisely In The Arthritic Knee Joint To Relieve Stiffness And Pain

of knee arthritis sufferers - possibly just like you. Even if you have heard of this treatment - or even tried it without good re-sults - please read this. You will find out why it may not have worked for you and how you may be able to get much better re-sults.

What is ThisTreatment?

This treatment is called viscosupplementation. And it has gained quite a bit of popularity in recent years and it has gotten mixed results for a couple of reasons. But before we get into that, here’s what you need to know about viscosup-plementation. When you have arthritis, you suffer a decrease in the cushioning and lubricating fluids in your knee. In oth-er words, your knee joint basically “dries up.” The lubricating fluid that decreases is called “synovial fluid.” Pharmaceutical com-panies (with the help of scientists) can now make natural synovial fluid gel-like compounds that, dur-ing viscosupplementation treatments...doctors can precisely introduce direct-ly into the knee and other joints. This helps replace the lu-bricating fluid to the knee joint - allowing it to move more freely and smoothly and often decreasing or even eliminating the pain.

What ResultsCan Be

Expected? Like all medical treat-ments, the results vary and can not be predicted. But many knee arthritis suffer-ers get dramatic results. It is not uncommon for pa-tients to either postpone knee replacement surgery for years... or even perma-nently cancel it.

But There Is A BIGProblem

The key is the treatment must be EXTREMELY PRECISE. If the injection is slightly off, the medica-tion will not get into the knee joint and the treat-ment will not work. That’s why the experts at Osteo Relief Institute use advanced digital im-aging so they can see the medicine going directly into the knee joint during the treatment. Research shows that doctors performing joint injections without imaging miss the joint as much as 30% of the time. If you have tried visco-supplementation without this special digital imaging without good results - this may be why. That’s why Osteo Relief Institute takes it even one step further. They do not just use one step process of advanced imaging during treatment - they use two in their “double confirma-tion” process. This is to ensure patients get the best possible results.

AnotherImportant

Factor Viscosupplementation medications also come in several different brands and chemical make-ups. Just like all medications, some people respond bet-ter to some than others. While many doctors only use one brand, the experts at Osteo Relief Institute use several and great effort is taken to figure out what the best one for YOU is. One last thing: The experts at Osteo Relief In-stitute have found that the earlier you start Viscosup-plementation the better. This is most likely be-cause the longer you wait - the more joint destruction takes place. That’s why Osteo Relief

is now seeing so many pa-tients as young as 45. Summary: If you have knee arthritis pain and have not tried Viscosup-plementation, you should look into it as soon as pos-sible. If you have tried it with-out good results, you may still be able to get great results with the proper im-aging and specific medica-tion

Who Should Try This

Treatment? Not everyone is a can-didate for this treatment. But if you are, there is a good chance you may re-lieve some... or possibly all of your pain. You are a potential candidate for this treat-ment if you have knee pain and have not gotten good results from anti-inflammatory medication or other common arthritis treatments. Especially if you have already tried viscosupple-mentation without good results. The best way to tell if you are a good candi-date for this treatment is to be screened by one of

the doctors at Colorado Springs, CO.

What To Do NextIf You Are In Pain:

Your Invitation Osteo Relief Institute offers a limited number of complimentary knee arthritis treatment screen-ings every month. These screenings are a way for knee arthritis sufferers to get some of their ques-tions answered and see if they are a candidate for this treatment. If you would like a complimen-tary screening, just call 719-323-6612 and tell the scheduling specialist who answers the phone, “I would like a complimen-tary knee arthritis screen-ing.” The screenings fill up fast every month. If you do not call in time to get one this month, the spe-cialist will schedule you for next month. This screening is no cost and no obligation. This treatment is cov-ered by many insurance plans and Medicare.

WARNING: This Treatment Can Fail When Done Without This Advanced Imaging

Non-Surgical Spine Pain, Vein Treatment,And Joint Arthritis Relief

PAID ADVERTIsem*nT

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24 Pikes Peak Courier December 17, 2014

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In June of this year, Harvey cited post traumatic stress disorder and took a leave of absence. Harvey resigned in August.

The Black Forest Fire Board interviewed Jack, Rebitski and Scott Van Boerum (cur-rently the fire chief for the Arivaca Fire Dis-trict in Arizona). The three candidates all boasted extensive resumes.

Rebitski has more than 16 years of firefighting and emergency experience, including time with the Fountain Fire Department and American Medical Re-sponse. Van Boerum has more than 27 years of experience with fire departments

in Arizona.The three men held a meet-and-greet

with the public on Dec. 9, providing the community a chance to meet the candi-dates and ask questions. During the pub-lic session, Jack spoke about establishing trust between the fire department and the public.

“Communication is how we fix things,” Jack said. “Obviously there may be some lack of public trust on some sides, but if you look at we just got a new Fire Board put in a place and I think we can work with transparency.”

Jack added that he does think the com-munity is “at the fully recovered state yet.”

The Black Forest fire burned about 15,000 acres, destroyed 488 homes and killed two people.

Continued from Page 22

Jack

Lake George Charter School Board election results are inBy N. W. OliverContributing writer

The count is done and John Bartlett and Jason Kirkland are Lake George Charter School’s new board members. The elec-tion was conducted Tuesday, Nov. 18 at the school which saw nearly one hundred people voting. As there were two board po-sitions open, each person was allowed to vote for two candidates.

John Bartlett, the school’s volunteer re-source officer garnered 79 votes which put him far in the lead. The race between Kirk-land and the incumbent board president, John Rakowski, was much closer with Kirk-land receiving 51 to Rakowski’s 48. Who will take the position of board president will be decided on by the board at the next meet-ing.

At a “meet the candidates” meeting held Nov. 10 in the school gymnasium each of the candidates campaigned for the posi-tions. They gave speeches and answered several questions.

John Bartlett introduced himself as an ex-high school and college teacher and ex-police officer. He believes that children are

“our most valuable resource” and that their safety should be among our chief concerns. He was inspired to run for the school board opening after the recent school shootings. “I love the kids here and don’t want them hurt,” says Bartlett. As a teacher, Bartlett has had a lot of interaction with school boards and believes that the main job of a board member is to ensure that “each teacher has something to teach each student and that each student learns something every day.”

Jayson Kirkland introduced himself as a “bachelor of accounting and finance with conservative roots.” “I understand money and I understand people,” Kirkland said. He believes that most school board prob-lems have to do with funding. With his ex-perience with finance, he wants to get the funding to expand the school programs and increase the students’ access to technol-ogy. “I have three children that attend this school,” Kirkland said, “I want to be on the board to improve their educations and the educations of all the students.” He believes that the school board member’s main job is to help the school grow in the right direc-tion. According to him, that is done by rais-ing attendance and procuring the funds to provide educators with what they need.

AREA CLUBSALL OF our own trainings. Levels of participation range from general support (auxillary), mission support, SarTech I and SarTech II. Please contact Janet Bennett, membership chair, at 719-306-0826 for more info.

TOTAL JOINT replacement. Pikes Peak Regional Hospital & Surgery Center o�ers free classes on total joint replacement. Classes are free and o�ered every second and fourth Thursday. Learn about the bene�ts of joint replacement, what to expect and how to prepare. You don’t have to be scheduled for a joint replacement to attend a class. Classes are at Pikes Peak Regional Hospital, 16420 W. Hwy. 24 Woodland Park, in the Café Meeting room. They run from 2-4 p.m. Contact program coordinator Wendy Westall at 719-686-5779 for information. To register for an upcoming class, call 719- 686-5769.

TRE’S WOODLAND Park Playgroup meets from 9-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays at the The Resource Exchange - Early Intervention Colorado, 509 Scott Ave. Suite B in the Woodland Exchange building. 719-687-5047 or 719-233-5873.

TELLER COUNTY Cancer Survivors Support & Education Group meets from 5:30-7:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Teller County Public Health Conference Room, at 11115 W. Hwy 24, Unit 2C, Divide. We focus on healthy living during and after cancer treatment. Survivors of any type cancer and caregivers are welcome. Call Carol or Shelley at 719-687-1180 or Darlyn at Teller County Public Health, 719-687-6416.

TOPS, TAKE O� Pounds Sensibly, the original nonpro�t weight-loss group is an educational support group providing weekly weigh-ins and programs to help members make posi-tive changes in the role food plays in their lives. Local chapter meets every Thursday at 10 a.m. in Green Mountain Falls at the Church of the Wildwood. Call Evelyn at 748-8383 for more information.

UTE PASS Sleep Support Group Do you wear cpap? Have problems sleeping? Then join the Ute Pass Sleep Support

Group. This group is led bya clinical sleep educator and registered respiratory therapist dedicated to helping those with sleep disorders. Poor sleep can a�ect all aspects of our lives, including job performance, personal relationships, and our overall health. Please join me, admission is free. This group meets at 6 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month at the Woodland Park Library, downstairs in the meeting room. Call 719-689-0431 or email [emailprotected].

WEIGHT WATCHERS meetings are every Tuesday in Wood-land Park and Cripple Creek. Woodland Park meetings are 5:30 p.m., weigh-ins start at 5 p.m. at the Ute Pass Cultural Center, 210 E. Midland Ave. Cripple Creek group opens at 5:30 p.m. and meetings begin at 6 p.m. at the Aspen Mine Center, 166 E. Bennett Ave. Weight Watchers meetings last about 35 minutes, and it is recommended members attend one meeting each week to learn about healthy eating, gain motivation and get a con�dential weigh-in to track progress. Public is welcome to visit and see what it’s about at a participating Weight Watchers meeting with no obligation to join.

WELLNESS HOUR meets at 2 p.m. the third Saturday of every month at the Lost Dutchman Resort. Learn how to enjoy health with the help of a free certi�ed health coach.Join us for a whole new way to think about weight loss and wellness as we share inspiring stories of personal transformations and lots of practical ideas for thriving instead of just surviving. This is not a diet, but a comprehensive health program that can help you or a loved one create long term health in your lives. Join us for an afternoon of encouragement and enlighten-ment.Call 719-689-0431 for more information or email [emailprotected].

WINGS PROVIDES therapist facilitated support groups for women and men in which survivors are believed, accepted and no longer alone. There is a women’s group on Tuesday evening and one on Thursday evening. We are also starting a Loved Ones Group for family and friends of survivors. For more information contact the WINGS o�ce at 800-373-8671. Visit www.wingsfound.org.

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WP students win robotics competitionBy Michelle JacksonFor the Courier

Students from Columbine and Gate-way Elementary schools, along with stu-dents from Woodland Park School Dis-trict’s Cottage Homeschool program, were well represented at the Lego WeDo Design Challenge Dec. 4 in Colorado Springs.

The Challenger Learning Center of Col-orado provides opportunities for budding engineers to compete in Lego WeDo Ro-botics at the fourth- and fifth-grade levels.

Woodland Park Elementary students have participated in these competitions for the past three years. It has been such a successful experience that WPSD is now sponsoring its own competition for stu-dents each spring. Coaches for the Wood-land Park teams were Michelle Jackson, gifted/talented teacher; Kathy Rhodus, STEM coordinator; and Sandy Struble, cottage/online teacher.

The students were all given the same challenge: to build a machine that would lift a rocket to a vertical position and sta-bilize it. It was to have three moveable parts that were programmed through the computer. They had 35 minutes to build it, test it, name it and figure out how to present it to the judges.

The judges included engineers from local industries and cadets from the Air Force Academy. The judges asked sev-eral questions about the invention they designed, their design process, and their abilities to work as a team.

“The design challenge was even more meaningful this year because I saw so much growth in the ability to work as a team besides bringing their unique design talents,” Struble said.

First place for fourth grade was award-ed to the homeschooler’s team from Gate-way Elementary School. Trever St. John and Lucas Matignon studied robotics in Cottage School during science class, and attended after-school “design challenge” practices as well. They attend the Cottage School, a program that meets the needs of homeschool families by offering enrich-ment subjects to homeschool students that may not have access to all of the re-sources which the schools have available. This is the first time Cottage School en-tered a team.

The second place was awarded to Kayla Stimits, Nathan Gallup, and Zach Moriar-ty, a fourth-grade team from Columbine. Alex Oram and Makayla Newcom also represented Columbine by meeting their challenge. The stiff competition at the fifth-grade level was met successfully by Gateway’s team of fifth graders, Alex Rich-ardson and Carson Bowman.

“Our elementary students have shown so much growth in this area over the past three years. Woodland Park’s Middle and High schools are able to offer much higher level robotics now than ever be-fore, since students are coming to them with more experience,” Jackson said. “We plan to continue to offer more robotics challenge classes and enter more compe-titions in the future.”

Gateway Elementary School �fth-graders Alex Richardson and Carson Bowman appear to enjoy being interviewed by U.S. Air Force cadets during the Robotics competition. Photo by Pat Hill

Members of the Woodlands Academy robotics team cheer for their classmates during the First Lego League Competition Nov.8 in Colorado Springs. Courtesy photo

Students from Castle Rock’s Woodlands Academy preform their presentation for the judges Nov.8 at the First Lego League Competiton in Colorado Springs. The Soaring Owls’ presentation focused on the di�erent way in which students can learn. Courtesy photo

The Woodlands Academy robotics team poses with the trophy for best presentation Nov.8 at the First Lego League competiton in Colorado Springs. Courtesy photo

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26 Pikes Peak Courier December 17, 2014

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SPORTS

Optimism abounds with Cripple Creek-Victor basketball teamsBoth Pioneers squads enjoying early successBy Danny [emailprotected]

The Cripple Creek-Victor boys and girls basketball teams are off and running in search of greater success on the hardwood.

“Our goal every day is to come out and play our best, and every week we are get-ting better,” said Madie Berger, a three-year starter for the girls. “I have high ex-pectations for this year. I have a lot of faith in these girls. They’re all great girls.”

Berger, who averaged a team-leading 12.3 points per game last season, is one of the core four that have played together the last three years. The others are seniors Mi-kaela Schell (6.6 ppg) and Autumn Hern-don, and junior Julie Brown.

Other returners include sophom*ore Bella Skottegaard, and juniors Tara Tarasi and Sierra Olmsted.

Three freshman are on this year’s squad; Kaylee Crippen, Emma Hansen and Chey-enne Walinski.

The Pioneers’ girls were 2-13 last sea-son under Michelle Eastman, a teacher at the school. Eastman stepped down mid-way through the campaign due to health concerns with her pregnancy and was re-placed by Darby Remley. But Eastman is back this year as an assistant under Paul McGinn.

McGinn works with special education students at the school.

“I like his coaching style,” Herndon said. “We have a lot to work with with two coaches who know the game. We have our old stuff and new stuff to put together and will make us better.”

CC-V started the season on a bit of rough note, losing 41-5 to Colorado

Springs School and 37-8 to Platte Canyon. The Pioneers’ offense got going in a 57-32 loss to Moffat on Dec. 6. CC-V picked up its first victory Dec. 12 (38-24 over Pikes Peak Christian).

McGinn is stressing a more controlled, yet up-tempo offense that relies on crisp passes and good shot selections.

“We don’t want to rush it and we don’t want to make any bad passes, but if we’re open we’re going to shoot,” Herndon said.

The Pioneers (1-3) don’t play again un-til Jan. 9 at Cotopaxi. By then, Schell, the point guard, should be recovered from her hyper-extended knee and the team should be at full strength.

McGinn was actually slated to be the boys’ junior varsity coach this season, but in October Remley informed CC-V athletic director Jim Bertrand that she would not be able to coach, so McGinn was promot-ed to be the girls’ head coach.

“I really want the girls to understand the fundamentals of the game,” McGinn said. “We’re working on bounce passes and shooting free throws, and trying to give them game-type situations in practice so they get used to the pressure of games.”

The Pioneers’ boys also have a new coach in Mike Eivins. He is the program’s third head coach in as many seasons. He follows Bertrand (2012-13) and Jordan Buss (2013-14). CC-V was 1-16 under Buss.

“We’re very athletic; quick and fast,” Eivins said. “Talent is not the issue here. We have that. It’s a matter of how far the kids come around as to what kind of suc-cess they will have and how far they will advance.

“We need to work on our confidence and fundamentals. If they can reach those milestones we get to where we want to be. We have to keep working hard and learn to play together.”

The boys are led by senior returning starters C.J. Salazar (5.3 ppg, 10.1 rebounds per game), David Burks (5 ppg) and Cody

Rice. Another senior, Tyler Regester, is also expected to see a lot of playing time.

Eivins, a special education teacher at the school, added that other players who should see action on a regular basis are juniors Jake Hendrickson and David Wuellner, and sophom*ore Conner Brown. Senior Nick Linenberger has been out with an injury all season, but is expected to re-turn to action sometime after the Christ-mas break.

“Coach Eivins is a lot more intense and likes a lot more running,” Rice said “He brings a lot of intensity.

“It’s a different atmosphere than we’re used to, but he’s a good coach and I think we will have a good season.”

The CC-V boys are 2-3 with victories

over Platte Canyon and Pikes Peak Chris-tian. The Pioneers’ losses are to Colorado Springs School, Mountain Valley and Edi-son.

“A realistic goal for us is to keep playing as a team, gel well together and just work harder all season,” said Salazar, who plays post alongside Rice.

The Pioneers are off until Jan. 9 at Co-topaxi.

“My job is to get everyone involved and make sure they get good shots,” said Burks, a point guard. “With our offense you can do whatever you want. As long as it’s a good shot coach doesn’t mind.

“We don’t always have to go to a certain person to score. It’s a more flowing offense than in past years.”

The Cripple Creek-Victor girls have a new head coach in Paul McGinn (in suit). His assistant is Michelle Eastman (in red scarf). Eastman was the head coach the previous two seasons. The Pioneers are led by four returning starters. From left to right: Madie Berger, Mikaela Schell, Julie Brown and Autumn Herndon. Photos by Danny Summers

Mike Eivins (in blue dress shirt) is the new head coach of the Cripple Creek-Victor boys’ basketball team. His assistant is Robin Crippen (wearing pink scarf). The team is led by four seniors. From left to right: David Burks, Tyler Regester, C.J. Salazar and Cody Rice.

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Pikes Peak Courier 27 December 17, 2014

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In the past year, your contributions have reached over 1,000 Teller County residents with programs

that strengthen families.

Thank you to our generous organizational sponsors.

Premier Sponsor: Sponsors:

Contributors:

Supporters:

Thank you to community members who served on our volunteer Board of Directors this year:Steve Randolph, PresidentDan Nicholson, Vice PresidentLori Gray, SecretaryDustin Bench, Treasurer

Adric ArndtSam GouldKatie RexfordNancy ThompsonDebbie Upton

Morgan StanleyNorth Teller Build A Generation Wells Fargo

Al & Roberta Born, Bierwerks, Bronco Billy’s, IREA, Sam & Elaine Gould, VectraBank, Victor Lebario, Wildwood Casino

www.cpteller.org 719-686-0705

WP boys’ basketball team heads into Christmas break searching for � rst win Panthers play next game Jan. 3 By Danny Summers [emailprotected]

It was not the kind of homecoming John Paul Geniesse or his Panthers’ basketball team was hoping for when Woodland Park hosted Discovery Canyon on Dec. 11.

It was clear from the opening tip that Discovery Canyon was out to make a state-ment against its former coach. The Thun-der dominated every facet of the contest in a lopsided 78-33 victory for its fi rst win of the season.

Woodland Park dropped to 0-5.“I don’t know if we were trying to make

a statement, but it’s always nice to beat your old coach by 45 points,” Thunder se-nior point guard Mitchell Carter said with a smile. “We played well tonight and it showed on the scoreboard.”

Geniesse started the Discovery Canyon program from scratch eight years ago. He left after the 2012-13 season to become an assistant coach at Doane College in Nebraska, only to return to the Pikes Peak region, where he was hired as Woodland Park’s coach in May.

“I knew exactly what they were going to bring; I knew exactly what they were going to do offensively and defensively,” Geniesse said about his former players. “I knew they were going to come up here and lay everything on the line; and they did that.

Geniesse added that the game was emotional for him as well.

“I had great memories (at Discovery Canyon) for six years,” he said. “It’s always going to be in my heart.

“But on the other side of that we hurt ourselves tonight. We turned the ball over way too many times, which gave us fewer

opportunities to be effective in the half court.”

Time and again Woodland Park put it-self in diffi cult positions with turnovers and failing to grab defensive rebounds, as well as put-backs on offense.

“We’re still trying to put it together as a team,” said Woodland Par junior guard Dominik Cunico, who scored fi ve points. “We just have to keep working on our team chemistry.

“Turnovers have been a problem for us all year. It’s all in our heads. We get a little bit of pressure and then it goes downhill. We just have to be patient.”

Dalton Lefever and Sam Hopfe (six points) are the lone seniors on the team. Geniesse has three sophom*ores and two freshmen on the varsity.

Hopfe, who leads the team in scor-ing, said he and his teammates were well aware of the emotional ties between Ge-niesse and his former club.

“(Coach Geniesse) warned us that (Dis-covery Canyon) would be fi red up,” Hopfe said. “He told us that we needed to match their intensity.

“We have a few weeks off before our next game so that will give us time in prac-tice to work on some things and turn this around.”

The Thunder (1-2) lost to Coronado, 53-33, on Dec. 9 as it shot just 20 percent from the fi eld and 18 percent from the free throw line. New Discovery Canyon coach Al Blanc, who has more than 600 career victories over 42 years, didn’t need to say much to get his team focused against Woodland Park.

“We had a tough loss on Tuesday (at Coronado) and we knew we had to come out and be energetic; especially against Geniesse,” said Thunder 6-foot-6 senior center Jacob Hein. “It’s something we nev-er thought we would see - playing against our old coach - but we’re glad we pulled out the `W,’”

Blanc did his best to keep his players in

check and not let their emotions take over.“Anytime you come on the road and you

can win like this it’s a credit to the kids,” Blanc said. “I told these guys you have to come out with emotion, but you have to also control it. You’re going to be playing a coach that wants to beat you guys. You have to understand that, but you have to play under control.”

Junior Colin McGettigan led all Thun-der players in scoring with 17 points. Also scoring in double fi gures were juniors Jake DeLange (15) and Brandon Storch (10). Hein added nine, while Carter and Austin Williams added seven each.

The Thunder’s pressing defense smoth-ered Woodland Park as it converted turn-overs into easy buckets. Discovery Canyon led 18-9 after the fi rst quarter and 44-18 at halftime.

The Thunder didn’t let in the second

half, leading by as many as 49 points with a little over two minutes remaining in the fourth.

“We were just trying to get rotation and work on stuff, and a lot of things went well for us tonight,” Carter said. “A lot of us played football and we came into this sea-son without really knowing the plays. That takes some time, but I think we’re starting to come around.”

Discovery Canyon heads into the Christmas break with home games against Pueblo South and The Classical Academy.

“We have to continue to work on basic fundamentals and concepts of the game and go from there,” Blanc said. “We have to keep playing with a lot of intensity and get the other team to turn the ball over.”

Woodland Park does not play its next game until Jan. 3 at Roosevelt in the Roughrider Shootout.

Woodland Park junior guard Dominik Cunico, No. 23 in white, tries to work his way to the basket during a game against Discovery Canyon on Dec. 11. Cunico � nished with 5 points in the Panthers’ 78-33 loss. Photo by Paul Magnuson

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OF GAMESGALLERYc r o s s w o r d • s u d o k u

& w e e k l y h o r o s c o p e

GALLERY OF GAMESc r o s s w o r d • s u d o k u & w e e k l y h o r o s c o p e

SALOME’S STARSFOR THE WEEK OF DEC 15, 2014

ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Make your holiday prepa-rations one step at a time in order to avoid being over-whelmed and leaving things undone. That confusing family situation continues to work itself out.

TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Ease this year’s holiday money pressures by letting your thrifty side guide you as you look for those perfect gifts that typically reflect your good taste and love of beauty.

GEMINI (May 21 to Jun 20) You’ll have a good han-dle on potential holiday problems if you delegate tasks to family members, friends or co-workers -- most of whom will be more than happy to help out.

CANCER (Jun 21 to Jul 22) Right now you are es-pecially vulnerable to holiday scams that seek to take advantage of your generosity. Best advice: Check them out before you send out your checks.

LEO (Jul 23 to Aug 22) The upcoming holiday season gives the Big Cat much to purr about. Relationships grow stronger, and new opportunities loom on the horizon, just waiting to be pounced on.

VIRGO (Aug 23 to Sept 22) A changing situation brings conflicting advice about how to go forward with your holiday plans. Your best bet: Make the decision you feel most comfortable with.

LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Holiday plans get back on track after some confusion about the direction you expected to take. A potentially troublesome money matter needs your immediate attention.

SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) Your holiday prepara-tions are on track. But you need to confront a personal situation while you can still keep it from overwhelming everything else.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Tight financial matters ease a bit during this holiday season. But the sagacious Sagittarian is well-advised to keep a tight hold on the reins while shopping for gifts.

CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 19) Don’t put off mak-ing decisions about this year’s holiday celebrations, despite the negative comments you’ve been getting from several quarters. Do it NOW!

AQUARIUS (Jan 20 to Feb 18) The holidays will bring new friends and new opportunities. Meanwhile, be careful to use your energy wisely as you go about making holiday preparations.

PISCES (Feb 19 to Mar 20) There’s good news coming from a most unlikely source. And it could turn out to be one of the best holiday gifts you have had in years. Remember to stay positive.

BORN THIS WEEK: You are respected for your honesty and loyalty. You make friends slowly -- but with rare exceptions, they’re in your life forever.

© 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.

TELLER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT

Nov. 20Michael Chase McLaughlin, date of

birth Sept. 28, 1973 of Woodland Park, was arrested on a warrant for failure to appear on an original charge of felony menacing. Bond set at $5,000.

Nov. 21Joshua David Weaver, date of birth

April 27, 1992 of Cripple Creek, was served and released on the charge of harassment.

Nov. 22Michael Bennett, date of birth Dec. 23,

1971 of Colorado Springs, was arrested on a warrant for failure to comply on an original charge of protection order viola-tion. This was a no bond warrant.

Nov. 23Gerald Edward Lee Bertalot, date of

birth Dec. 13, 1978 of Colorado Springs, was arrested for driving under revocation, driving under the influence and posses-sion of an open container. Bond set at $4,000.

Lois Laura Wark, date of birth May 2, 1965 of Colorado Springs, was arrested for defective head lamp and driving under restraint (cancelled/denied). Bond set at $1,000. Ms. Wark was also arrested

on a warrant for failure to appear on an original charge of no insurance. Bond set at $400.

Nov. 24Eric Thomas Brenckle, date of birth

May 21, 1987 of Colorado Springs, was arrested on a warrant for failure to ap-pear for a court appearance. Bond set at $5,000.

Nov. 25Nate Allen Hume, date of birth April

15, 1972 of Simla, was arrested on a war-rant for failure to comply on an original charge of driving while ability impaired and lane usage violation. This was a no bond warrant.

Magan Elaine Viall, date of birth Jan. 5, 1985 of Colorado Springs, while incar-cerated, was served with a warrant for failure to comply on an original charge of possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine-two grams or less). Bond set at $1,000.

Nov. 27Andrea Lynn Sager, date of birth Aug.

4, 1989 of Victor, was arrested for violation of a protection order. Bond set at $500.

Nov. 28

Adam Christopher Greene, date of birth March 24, 1983 of Divide, was ar-rested for domestic violence, harassment, child abuse and third degree assault. Bond set at $3,000.

Nov. 29Debra Kay Swanson, date of birth

May 26, 1955 of Calhan, was served and released on the charge of defective head lamp and driving under restraint (can-celled/denied).

James Ryan Hayes, date of birth Aug. 6, 1993 of Woodland Park, was arrested for driving under restraint (suspended) and vehicle not equipped with tail lamps as required. Bond set at $1,000.

Michael Warren Chapman, date of birth Jan. 17, 1955 of Florissant, was ar-rested for driving under the influence, driving with excessive alcohol content, careless driving, failure to drive in a single lane (weaving) and defective head lamp. Bond set at $1,000.

Nov. 30Adlena Cleopatra McLean, date of

birth Nov. 12, 1979 of Colorado Springs, was arrested for criminal impersonation, failure to dim, driving under restraint

(suspended) and obstruction. Bond set at $1,000.

Antonio Estrada Martin, date of birth Nov. 22, 1988 of Pueblo, was arrested for violation of a protection order. Bond set at $1,000.

Dec. 1David Scott Wasson, date of birth June

9, 1954 of Victor, was served and released on the charge of obstructing government operations and harassment.

Rachael Nichole Stafford, date of birth May 6, 1990 of Colorado Springs, was ar-rested on a warrant for failure to appear on an original charge of speeding, driving under restraint and failure to display proof of insurance. Bond set at $1,200.

Dec. 2Kevin J. Dowling, date of birth Feb.

13, 1964 of Florissant, was served and released on the charge of harassment and third degree assault.

Keith Allen Sanders, date of birth Feb. 6, 1972 of Woodland Park, was arrested on a warrant for failure to comply on an original charge of possession of a con-trolled substance. Bond set at $5,000.

RECREATION REPORT

Woodland Park Parks & Recreation offers the following programs and sports. Sign up at least a week prior to session starting. Classes may be cancelled due to lack of participants. Call 719-687-5225 or stop by our office at 204 W. South Ave. Online registration and class information available at www.wpparksandrecreation.org.

Winter Day in the ParkCelebrate winter break with an after-

noon of skating and sledding (weather permitting) and pictures with Santa from 3-5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 19, at Memorial Park. The family event is for all ages. Dress warmly and bring your ice skates and sleds. Games, snacks and hot chocolate will be provided.

Adult Recreational Drop-in SportsPick-up games for various sports are

offered, with playing time divided among all participants. Gather your friends, fam-

ily and neighbors for a Sunday afternoon of play. Each month will offer a different sport. Pick-up game times are 4-6 p.m. in the Middle School Main Gym. Cost is $5 per person, per drop-in, or get a drop-in sports punch card (10 punches for $40).

December is kickballJanuary is volleyballFebruary is basketballMarch is floor hockey

Health and Fitness Classes, AdultsBody Sculpting, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30

p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, in the Parks & Recreation Classroom. Cost is $60 per session, $8 drop-in, or fitness punch card.

Namaste Yoga (ages 15 and older), 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays, in the Parks & Recreation Classroom. Cost is $28 per ses-sion, $9 drop-in, or fitness punch card.

Anusara Yoga, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Thurs-days, in the Parks & Recreation Class-room. Cost is $28 per session, $8 drop-in,

or fitness punch card.Mat Pilates, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Tuesdays and Thursdays, in the Parks & Recreation Classroom. Cost is $64 per session, $36 for a half-session, or $10 drop-in.

Sun Style Taiji 97 Form, 3-4:30 p.m. Wednesdays, in the Parks & Recreation Classroom. Cost is $40 per session, or $15 drop-in.

Zumba, call if interested in Zumba. Cost is $24 per session (three classes in a session). Must have a minimum of five participants. For ages 12 and older.

Cripple Creek Parks and Recreation’s fitness center is open from 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. Membership is $14 per month. Silver Sneaker member-ships are free for qualifying seniors. Call 719-689-3514.

OngoingSilver Sneakers classic class, 10:30-

11:30 a.m. Fridays and Sundays. Classes are free to Silver Sneakers members.

English as a Second Language, 6-7 p.m. Thursdays. Cost $5.

Aikido for adults (martial arts), 6-7 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. Cost is $5.

Aikido for kids (martial arts), 4:30-5:30 Thursdays. Cost is $5.

Volleyball open gym for adults, noon to 2 p.m. Sundays at Cresson Elementary. Free

Yoga class, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. Cost is $7, or $20 for 5 classes.

Zumba (dance exercise), 4:15-5:15 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Free with fitness membership.

Cub Scouts for grades K-5, 4:15-5:15 Tuesdays when school is in session.

Women’s Bible study, 5-6:30 p.m. Wednesdays.

Free soup lunch, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Fridays. Everyone welcome.

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Pikes Peak Courier 29 December 17, 2014

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Advertise: 303-566-4100OurColoradoClassifieds.com

Local Focus. More News.22 newspapers & 24 websites. Connecting YOU to your LOCAL community.

ColoradoCommunityMedia.com 303-566-4100

CAREERS

Help Wanted

DREAM JOB!Fishing Camp Hosts/Caretakers NeededHistoric Fly Fishing Camp lookingfor person or couple to live on siteyear round. Open April-October.Will oversee the renovation of theLodge, Cabins and stream

improvements. Must desire an outdoors/wilderness lifestyle, have experience in leading and managing a similar operation andbe able to create a world-class

experience for guests with workingknowledge and experience of flyfishing, hiking and horseback

riding. We are also looking forRanch Hands, a Country Cook andHousekeeper.

Send resume with cover letter to:The BroadmoorC. Johnson/HRPO Box 1439Colorado Springs, CO 80901-1439

Events and Marketing Manager –City of Cripple Creek Marketing

and Events Department. $46,460-$62,857 hr., DOE. Full time, full

benefits. Closing date: Open untilfilled; initial application review willbegin January 12, 2015. Full job adand application available atwww.cripplecreekgov.com EOE.

Monthly rental in Cripple Creek tobusinesses for employees. 3 bed-rooms. No more per diem. Tony719- 632-9991 or 719-964-4266

Pikes Peak Community College,Colorado Springs, CO is acceptingapplications for an Assistant

Controller Finance. Salary$5,833.33 gross per month.

Applications must be submitted on-line at http://employment.ppcc.edu.AA/EEO

Shopping & Delivery with light foodprep & packaging. Woodland Parkarea. Mature person preferred.Must be honest, organized, reliable.Newer SUV-type 4 x 4 vehicle, cellphone & computer w/scannerneeded. Need somewhat open &flexible schedule. Part time. Mustbe non-smoking; pet-free preferred.Please reply with work history &references to [emailprotected]

Teller County is seeking full-timeTransportation Maintenance Work-er I’s for the Department of PublicWorks; DOT. Qualifications: HSdiploma or GED plus experience asa heavy equipment operator and/ortruck driver preferred. Possessionof a valid CO CDL with ability to ob-tain a Class A CDL within 90 daysof employment and ability to obtaindriving record upon request. Wage:$2,428/month plus benefits. Applic-ations available at the Human Re-sources Office, Centennial Building,112 North A Street, Cripple Creek,CO or at www.co.teller.co.us .Completed application submitted toHR at the above address. Open un-til filled - EOE

Woodland Park1000 square foot warehouse

Toilet, Sink, Seperate utilities16'x10' garage door

$1500/mo. Available (719)687-4122

Help Wanted

Teller County seeks an EquipmentMechanic II to work in the Fleet De-partment. Salary: $3,008 per monthwith full benefit package. Applica-tions available at the Human Re-source Office, Centennial Building,112 North A Street, Cripple Creek,CO or at www.co.teller.co.us .Completed application plus re-sume and cover letter submitted toHR at the above address. Open un-til filled - EOE

FARM & AGRICULTURE

Farm Products & Produce

Grain Finished Buffaloquartered, halves and whole

719-775-8742

GARAGE & ESTATE SALES

MERCHANDISE

Firewood

Firewood $175 per seasoned cordIf I stack it additional $25

Free DeliveryDelivery within 24 hours

for Teller and Park County (719)748-3146

FirewoodDry, Split, Delivered

150 cubic feet thrown in$180 call Ken 719-748-1138

FIREWOOD For SALE1 cord split/delivered $175 per cord

Call KC Wood Products719-337-3226

FIREWOODRounds $159/cord,

Split $199/cord4 cord load semi dry split $139/cord

2 cord minimumPick up in the forest rounds or logs

Hardwood/Pine Mix AvailableFuel Surcharge

David - Colorado Timber Products719-287-1234

Furniture

King Bedroom Set For SaleHeadboard, Footboard, Mattress &Box Springs 6 Drawer Dresser andEnd Table Brazilian Pine in verygood condition! $750.00 for wholeset Call 719-685-6933

Kid’s Stuff

Great Christmas giftsfor grandkids and kids;

2 hobby horses,one red car,

all never ridden.Sold separately, better built

and cheaper thanstore bought.

A must see! 687-8787

Miscellaneous

Atlas snowshoes, seldom used,8'x22', includes 2 cases, gaitersand ski poles. Great Christmas gift.Asking $70 OBO. 687-8787

PETS

Dogs

Beautiful Australian Shepherdpurebred puppies

8weeks, shots, dewormed,Vet checked, parents on site

(719)689-0781

Lost and Found

Check the TCRAS website to see ifyour pet has been located @www.tcrascolorado.com.

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

Homes

Executive Custom Home2 bedroom, 3 bath

fully furnishedWooded on 3.5 acres

Very PrivateNo dogs/children

$1500/month + utilities719-651-9682

Land ResourceAssociates

Ute Pass2bed 1 bath duplex $800

Woodland Park4 -5 bed 3 bath 3 car garage.

Picture perfect view of pikes peak.$2350

We have tenantslooking for rentals.

If you are interested in renting yourproperty, please call Donna Jones

at Land Resource Associates

719-684-8414

Offi ce Rent/Lease

372 square foot office$475/month utilities included. 130

East Grace Avenue, WoodlandPark

719-687-6042

TRANSPORTATION

Autos for Sale

1990 Nissan Pickup4 x 4 King Cab

135 K miles, 4 cylinder,4 speed transmissionNew Speedometer &

exhaust systemOff road tires Asking $2,500

229-347-6295

1993 Subaru LegacyRuns Good 4WD, good tires

$1200 See at 1011 West BowmanAve

Woodland Park719-687-4002

Parts

Used 4 Toyo A20 open country tiresP245/65R17 $100

719-499-1473

SERVICES

Appliance Repair

Gas Buster's Co.Artie Weaver

351-0418 / 748-1030Natural and L.P. Gas Lines

Gas Appliances Repaired andInstalled, Wood and Gas Stoves

and Fireplaces23 Years Experience

Residential - Commercial- Licensed - Insured

Bankruptcy

BANKRUPTCY, 24 HOURS. R U Month to Month or worse? Solutions. Cross Law Firm andDebt Relief Agency. 719-632-9991

Cleaning

• High-Quality Residential & Commercial Cleaning

• One Time, Weekly, Bi-Weekly, Monthly

• New Construction Clean Up• Vacation Homes/Rentals

• Move In & Move Out

• High-Quality Residential &

For all of your cleaning needs!

Call for details!(719) 689-0926

• licenced • insured • bonded

www.cottagestocastlescleaning.com

Concrete/Paving

Call Paul719-200-6754

Driveways, Patios, WalkwaysAlso Demo and Removal

CONCRETEPREP - PLACE - FINISH

Excavating/Trenching

Skidloader With Operator

$65/Hour

• Driveways • Backfill •• Grading • Concrete •

• Horse Pens • Landscaping •

Call Paul 719-200-6754

SKIDMAN

SKID WORK SERVICES

Driveways. Culverts. Grade Work. Backfill

Lot Clearing. Plus Much More

CALL 748-3246719-464-6666

General

• Wood • Gas • Pellet •Wood/CoalPh. (719) 748-3831

Handyman

HOME REPAIRSmall repairs to

complete remodeling.Tim Thomas,Woodland Park

687-6941As Always Free Estimates

References

MR Handy WorksHandyman Services &

Home RepairsOver 30 years experience

Call (719)494-7326

Painting

Painting

Tall Timber PaintingInterior and Exterior Painting

- Pressure Washing -- Exterior Window Washing -

Staining - DecksWood Restoration

Insured - FREE EstimatesCall Zane 719-314-6864

Plumbing

C.W’s Plumbing

719-687-4122

Repair, RemodelBoiler Service

Licensed & Insured!FROZEN PIPES & SEWERS

Roofi ng/Gutters

COMPLETE ROOFING SERVICE687-9645

www.woodlandroofing.comServing Teller County for over 48 years.

Woodland Roofing CompanyProtect your investment

Locally owned and operated in Teller CountyLicensed and Insured

All Work Guaranteed | Free Estimates

719-210-9235

Storage

5 locations within city limitsHUGE Move-in Special& Free Circular Lock

Carter Realty Property Mgmt.719-687-9274 • 303 E. Hwy. 24

WOODLAND PARKU - STORE - I T

Please Recycle this Publication when Finished

For Local News,Anytime of the Day

VisitColoradoCommunityMedia.com

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NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesTo advertise your public notices call 303-566-4100

Public NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic Notices

Public NoticeTELLER COUNTY VENDOR PMT LIST NOVEMBER 2014

GENERAL FUND $329,172.40 ROAD AND BRIDGE FUND $111,556.54 SOCIAL SERVICES FUND $34,174.19 CONSERVATION TRUST FUND $229.83 WASTEWATER UTILITY FUND $1,253.03 JAIL ENTERPRISE FUND $409,097.89 FLEET MANAGEMENT FUND $68,676.70 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS FUND $129.52 CLERK & RECORDER’S TRUST FUND $270,922.35 PAYROLL TRUST FUND $6,470.54 TOTAL $1,231,682.99

VENDOR AMOUNT DESCRIPTION

4RIVERS EQUIPMENT 1,467.45 SUPPL/SVCSACME FIRE & SAFETY 162.50 REP & MAINTAFFORDABLE MED SUPP 86.99 GRANT EXPAFLAC PREM HLDG 3,823.50 P/R RELATEDAMAZON.COM 101.32 GRANT EXPAPHSA 425.00 YEAR ENDAT&T 68.83 SERVICESAUTO TRUCK GRP 424.40 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLAXIS BUS TECH 161.58 MAINT/SUPPLB U RILEY-CUNNINGHAM 1,012.50 PROF SVCSBACA, A 67.57 C&R LIABILITIESBLACK HILLS ENERGY 6,923.62 OCCUPANCY COSTSBLACK, WM 260.00 PROF SVCSBLAISDELL, M 271.40 PROF SVCSBOB BARKER CO 781.23 SERVICESBONNELYCKE, C 164.32 PROF SVCSBRIM HEALTHCARE 980.62 GRANT EXPBURGESS, K 67.31 GRANT EXPC&A TROPHIES 31.10 PUB/EMPL RELATNCA STATE DISB UNIT 270.00 PASS-THRUCARE TRAK INTL 715.84 FURN/EQUIPCAREER BLDR GVT 1,500.00 SERVICESCASA 18,284.25 YEAR ENDCC HARDWARE & SUPPLY 600.54 MAINT/SUPPLCDD 127.00 GRANT EXPCDFRC 4,434.73 GRANT EXPCDHS 220.00 C&R LIABILITIESCDLE 115.00 REP & MAINTCDPHE 990.50 SUPPLIESCDPHE 33.00 C&R LIABILITIESCENTURYLINK 2,332.99 SERVICESCHEMATOX LAB INC 640.98 PROF SVCSCHILDS, J 121.44 TRAINING/TRAVELCHM 28,443.76 PROF SVCSCITY MARKET 45.28 GRNT/TRNG/TVLCITY OF CC 251.98 OCCUPANCY COSTSCITY OF CC 35.57 C&R LIABILITIESCITY OF VICTOR 72.50 C&R LIABILITIESCITY OF WP 17,858.69 C&R LIABILITIESCITY OF WP 2,743.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLCLASS C SOL GRP 612.89 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLCMI 62.35 SUPPLIESCO ASSESSOR’S ASSOC 325.00 TRAINING/TRAVELCO CODE CONSULT 4,586.00 PROF SVCSCO COMPRESSED GASES 111.60 SERVICESCO DEPT OF REV 300.00 PASS-THRUCO DEPT OF REV 252,467.48 C&R LIABILITIESCO DEPT PUB SAFETY 1,206.50 PROF SVCSCO NATURAL GAS 592.98 OCCUPANCY COSTSCO SPGS EXPRESS COUR 88.00 SERVICESCO STATE TREASURER 6,723.02 EMPLOYEE INSCOLORADO COUNTIES 2,450.00 TRAINING/TRAVELCOMM MEDIA OF CO 5,498.68 SERVICESCOMM OF CARING 300.00 GRANT EXPCOMM OF CARING 510.00 OCCUPANCY COSTSCOMM OF CARING 47,229.00 YEAR ENDCONFIDENTIAL CLIENT 739.67 GRANT EXPCREATIVE CONCEPTS 2,661.07 GRANT/SUPPLCREDIT SVC CO 578.92 PASS-THRUCSU EXT 3,175.00 PROF SVCSDANIELS LONG CHEV 18.56 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLDAVIS, J 199.90 GRANT EXPDEBORDE, K 15.23 TRAINING/TRAVELDEEP ROCK 366.91 SUPPLIESDENVER ATTY SVCS 31.00 REFUNDDEPPEN, G 100.00 PROF SVCSDISH NETWORK 224.86 SERVICESDIVERSIFIED COLL SVC 282.12 PASS-THRUDIVIDE COLLISION CTR 4,802.96 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLDIVIDE WATER PROVIDE 2,281.20 OCCUPANCY COSTSDOUTHIT, D W 100.00 PROF SVCSDOUTHIT, S R 100.00 PROF SVCSDZIEN, D 342.24 TRAINING/TRAVEL

EATON SALES & SVC 720.59 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLEBHERT, R 66.80 GRANT EXPEL PASO DA 79,633.15 PROF SVCSELECTION SYSTEMS 151.09 SUPPLIESELLIOTT, PAM 126.40 TRAINING/TRAVELESTEVANE, C 18.00 GRANT EXPEXPRESSTOLL 1.40 TRAINING/TRAVELEZ MESSENGER 43.00 REFUNDFAMILY SUPPORT REG 1,160.00 PASS-THRUFED DOC SHRED 35.00 SERVICESFLEET COMPUTING INTL 675.00 REP & MAINTFLEMMING, N 88.40 TRAINING/TRAVELFORWARD COMM 409.52 REP & MAINTFOXWORTH-GALBRAITH 547.46 REP & MAINTFRANCE, L 100.00 PROF SVCSFRANK J BALL, ATTY 40.00 REFUNDFREED CONSTRUCTION 60.27 C&R LIABILITIESG&K SERVICES 755.85 UNIFORMGALLS 109.95 SUPPLIESGCR TIRES & SVC 2,416.48 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLGEMPLER’S 1,300.30 SUPPLIESGLAXOSMITHKLINE 1,009.82 GRANT EXPGLOBAL GOVT/ED 3,606.40 FURN/EQUIPGOLD CAMP PRINTING 1,199.70 SUPPLIESGOVCONNECTION 1,860.93 SUPPLIESGRAINGER 81.80 FURN/EQUIPGRAY OIL 40,529.32 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLGREEN MTN FALLS 17.40 C&R LIABILITIESHAASE, M N II 291.52 PROF SVCSHAMIDAH, C 191.00 TRAINING/TRAVELHAZARDOUS WST EXPRTS 500.00 SERVICESHUBBARD, M 546.53 GRNT/SUPP/TRNGHUDSPETH, T 20.42 TRAINING/TRAVELHUMPHREY, P 15.62 TRAINING/TRAVELICC 28.00 SUPPLIESIMAGES IN INK 160.00 SUPPLIESIMPACT PUBL 120.00 YEAR ENDINTEGRA TELECOM 4,920.43 SERVICESINTERNTNL ACADAMIES 30.00 TRAINING/TRAVELIREA 9,250.12 OCCUPANCY COSTSISCPP 1,256.62 FURN/EQUIPIVY COTTAGE 845.00 GRANT EXPJARAMILLO, A 86.40 TRAINING/TRAVELJOHNSON, L 27.04 TRAINING/TRAVELJOHNSTONE SUPPLY 509.00 REP & MAINTJONES, V 118.80 TRAINING/TRAVELKELLY’S OFFICE CONN 28.99 SUPPLIESKIEWIT 1,041.25 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLKINT, S 94.27 TRAINING/TRAVELKRAMP, C 153.24 TRAINING/TRAVELL&L GAS SHOP 100.00 REFUNDLAWS EMRGY VEH 9,119.20 EQUIPMENTLEACHMAN, M 6.00 REFUNDLEDS 1,668.99 SUPPL/SVCSLEMMON, M 44.16 TRAINING/TRAVELLOEHNER, J 124.00 PROF SVCSLOEHNER, MC 124.00 PROF SVCSLOHMILLER & CO 352.38 REP & MAINTLONGMIRE, M 37.60 TRAINING/TRAVELMACHOL & JOHANNES 38.00 REFUNDMAXWELL, R 100.00 PROF SVCSMCCANDLESS 483.06 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLMCMILLAN, R III 216.00 REP & MAINTMEMORIAL HEALTH SYS 135.81 SERVICESMENDENILLA CONST 14,101.00 REP & MAINTMILLER, D 129.32 GRANT EXPMILLER, J 49.60 TRAINING/TRAVELMORSE, T 100.00 PROF SVCSMTECH 355.00 SERVICESMTN STATES PIPE & 46.20 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLMUNTZERT, K 857.94 GRANT EXPNEVE’S UNIFORMS 241.87 SUPPLIESNICOLETTI-FLATER 1,800.00 PROF SVCSOFFICE DEPOT 1,750.21 SUPPLIESOFFICEMAX INC 607.49 SUPPLIESOMNI 1,000.00 GRANT EXPORKIN 120.68 REP & MAINTPACER SVC CENTER 15.60 SERVICESPEAK INTERNET 285.00 SERVICESPEAK VISTA 11,082.24 YEAR ENDPECK, J 100.00 PROF SVCSPETTY CASH 314.04 SUPPL/SVCSPHIL LONG FORD 419.82 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLPIONEER CREDIT REC 56.00 PASS-THRUPITNEY BOWES 3,769.97 SERVICESPK ENTERPRISES 3,605.06 OCCUPANCY COSTSPK ENTERPRISES 6,958.50 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLPLATTEN, M 1,347.17 SVCS/TRNG/TVLPOLARIZED ELECTRIC 165.00 REP & MAINT

PP REG BLDG DEPT 500.00 REP & MAINTPP REG HOSPITAL 137.66 SERVICESPRECISION INSTRUMNTS 95.00 GRANT EXPPROFILE EAP 632.00 EMPLOYEE INSPTS OF AMERICA 1,340.90 EXTRADITIONPUEBLO RADIOLOGICAL 233.49 SERVICESQUALITY ALT 363.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLQUALITY SIGNS&DESIGN 240.00 REP & MAINTQUILL CORP 52.47 SUPPLIESR JORTBERG ASSOC 2,500.00 PROF SVCSR MCDONALD HOUSE 110.00 PASS-THRURIEGER, B 47.20 TRAINING/TRAVELROCKY TOP MOTEL 400.00 GRANT EXPRUCKER, K 169.60 GRANT EXPSAFEWAY 30.19 TRAINING/TRAVELSAMS CLUB 327.52 SUPPLIESSANOFI PASTEUR 1,090.43 GRANT EXPSHIPPING PLUS 53.34 SUPPL/SVCSSILVERTIP INTEGRATED 4,172.56 REP & MAINTSLOAN, D 235.48 TRAINING/TRAVELSMITH MED PTNRS 1,138.19 GRANT EXPSMITH, D 1,191.00 SERVICESSMITH, K 101.26 GRANT EXPSNARE CONSTR 31,590.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLSPARKS WILLSON ET AL 32,341.83 PROF SVCSSPARKS, T 200.00 REFUNDSTAPLES 222.16 SUPPLIESSTEPHENSON, S 74.00 TRAINING/TRAVELSTERICYCLE 155.82 OCCUPANCY COSTSSTEVER, S 89.87 C&R LIABILITIESSW REGIONAL CPR 90.00 TRAINING/TRAVELSWEET OFFICE SUPPL 127.75 SUPPLIESTAMARAC BUS PRK 11,300.00 OCCUPANCY COSTSTC C&R 10.98 EQUIPMENTTC EXTENSION FUND 509.93 SVCS/TRNG/TVLTC JAIL 194.00 SERVICESTELLER PARK CONS DIS 74.70 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLTELLER SENIOR COALTN 1,125.00 COMMUNITY SVCSTELRITE CORP 191.68 SERVICESTESSA 2,041.46 YEAR ENDTHE GAZETTE 118.04 YEAR ENDTHE UPS STORE 15.12 SUPPLIESTOTAL OFFICE SOLUTNS 138.06 SUPPLIESTRACTOR SUPPLY CO 413.80 SUPPLIESTRANSWEST TRUCKS 964.61 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLTRI COUNTY SEPTIC 350.00 REP & MAINTTWIN LANDFILL 600.00 SERVICESTYLER TECHN 3,234.00 YEAR ENDUMB 5,871.87 PURCH CARD PMTU OF CO 200.00 TRAINING/TRAVELUNITED REPROGRAPHIC 52.90 REP & MAINTUNITED SITE SVC 129.52 P/R RELATEDURS CORP 332.50 PROF SVCSUS POSTAL SERVICE 13.83 SERVICESUS POSTMASTER 49.00 SERVICESUTE PASS CONCRETE 64,480.05 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLVALERO MKTG 360.00 GRANT EXPVENTURE FUEL 60.00 GRANT EXPVERIZON WIRELESS 1,427.00 SERVICESVISION SVC PLAN 2,497.38 EMPLOYEE INSWAGNER EQUIP 1,396.07 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLWAKEFIELD & ASSOC 30.00 REFUNDWALMART 352.00 SUPPLIESWASTE MGT 1,542.22 OCCUPANCY COSTSWATT, V 22.03 TRAINING/TRAVELWAVINGATYOU.COM 616.00 REP & MAINTWAXIE SANITARY SUPP 1,120.59 SUPPLIESWEBER-WETZEL, D 28.40 TRAINING/TRAVELWELLS FARGO 368,429.98 PRIN/INTWESTRN CONVENIENCE 60.00 GRANT EXPWIMACTEL, INC 280.00 SERVICESWINGFOOT COMM TIRE 3,626.56 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLWOODLAND CNTRY LODGE 95.00 GRANT EXPWOODLAND HARDWARE 133.37 SUPPLIESWP NAPA 2,036.10 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLXEROX 39.85 REP & MAINTYOUNG WILLIAMS PC 13,287.05 SERVICESZENTZ, S C 6,500.00 PROF SVCSZUPANCIC, J 253.00 PROF SVCS

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72490First Publication: December 17, 2014Last Publication: December 17, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Check Payee or Description Amount

Cloud Services 99.00 Fortune Club 130.13 Fortune Club 113.27 Vista Print 11.98 Dell 199.99 JP Cooke Rabies Tags 57.50 Vista Print 39.30 Dell 159.99 Amazon 44.97 Ratchet Straps USA 19.83 Ratchet Straps USA 482.22 Fortune Club 88.51 DeWitt Down to Earth Protection 663.48 Bank ACH Fee 50.98 Gold Camp Bakery (75.00)Payroll 12,469.03 Aflac 33.00Delta Dental of Colorado 384.89 Orchard Trust Company, Llc 69.24 United Healthcare 8,433.72 US Postal Service 132.94 Hakes, Byron L 600.00 Brandon, Kerry 165.75 Park, Stephen D. 128.49 4Rivers Equipment 495.40 Accutest Mountain States 170.00 Acorn Petroleum 2,775.50 American Water Works Assoc. 76.00 BASIC 89.25 Century Link 64.83 Cirsa 9,225.25 City of Cripple Creek 11,916.45 Colorado Code Consulting, LLC 6,820.94 Colorado Community Media 56.00 Conley Construction 11,200.00 Cripple Creek Hrdware & Supply 281.23 Davis, Bruce 400.00 Debra Downs 203.91 Dr. James P. Wright 364.00 El Paso Cty Public Health Lab 40.00 Headframe Tavern 67.58 Konica Minolta Business 194.47 Konica Minolta Premier Finance 188.57 Macdougall & Woldridge PC 3,283.00 Parham, Becky 206.27 Perdew, Tarla 400.00 Petri, Veldean 400.00 Purgatoire Valley Construction 884.10 Quill 145.98 SGS North America Inc. 217.25 Taylor Fence Company 30,374.35 Thyssenkrupp Elevator Corp 432.94

T-Mobile 259.57 Wallace, Michael 400.00 Webster, Richard 73,140.00 Payroll 11,840.60 Orchard Trust Company, Llc 69.24 Beaty, Larry 1,000.00 City of Cripple Creek 4,500.00 Ivan’s Engineering 13,644.10 Long Branch Construction 2,550.00 Raynor Front Range 631.80 Sanducci Electric 2,016.37 Stanton Construction 40,975.00 Carquest 300.35 CBeyond 1,449.05 Chapman, Jim 250.00 Colorado Community Media 6.40 Colorado Natural Gas 411.65 Debra Downs 2,230.77 DHM Design 1,300.00 Executech Utah, Inc. 10.00 Garcia, Cathryn D 200.00 Grainger, Reed 500.00 Hayes Phillips Hoffman & Ca 1,650.57 Manitou Springs Chamber of Commerce 50.00 Mountain State Pipe 650.00 Nepenthe 105.00 Parham, Becky 122.07 Purgatoire Valley Construction 22,765.90 Quill 29.98 SGS North America Inc. 153.75 Teller County Waste 196.90 The Dependables 2,340.00 Dewberry-Goodkind Inc 8,105.00 Velocity Constructors Inc. 144,426.78 Payroll 11,172.31 Orchard Trust Company, Llc 69.24 Aflac 33.00Colorado Department Of Revenue 1,650.00 Delta Dental of Colorado 384.89 United Healthcare 8,433.72 Parham, Becky 317.93 Gold Camp Bakery 24.00 Petty Cash 296.09 Velocity Constructors Inc. 20,629.71 United States Treasury 3,972.40 United States Treasury 3,768.74 United States Treasury 3,755.94 498,265.30

Public Notice

Legal Notice No.:72501First Publication: December 17, 2014Last Publication: December 17, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

City of Victor Payments for October 2014

Public Trustees Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0047

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 1, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: MARK S MABRYOriginal Beneficiary: U.S. BANK N.A.Current Holder of Evidence of Debt:U.S. BANK N.A.Date of Deed of Trust: 11/10/2010Recording Date of Deed of Trust :11/29/2010Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.640329Original Principal Amount: $147,750.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 4 5 , 9 7 5 . 7 4

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to make timely payments requiredunder said Deed of Trust and the Evid-ence of Debt secured thereby.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 578, COLORADO MOUNTAIN ES-TATES FILING NO. 4, COUNTY OFTELLER, STATE OF COLORADO.

which has the address of:163 Bighorn LaneFlorissant, CO 80816

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJanuary 28, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/3/2014Last Publication: 12/31/2014Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/6/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: TORBEN M WELCH AttorneyRegistration #34282MESSNER & REEVES, LLC1430 WYNKOOP STREET, SUITE 300 ,DENVER, COLORADO 80202Phone: (303) 623-1800Fax: (303) 623-2606Attorney file #: 1445.312040260

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0047First Publication: 12/3/2014Last Publication: 12/31/2014Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0047

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 1, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: MARK S MABRYOriginal Beneficiary: U.S. BANK N.A.Current Holder of Evidence of Debt:U.S. BANK N.A.Date of Deed of Trust: 11/10/2010Recording Date of Deed of Trust:11/29/2010Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.640329Original Principal Amount: $147,750.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 4 5 , 9 7 5 . 7 4

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to make timely payments requiredunder said Deed of Trust and the Evid-ence of Debt secured thereby.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 578, COLORADO MOUNTAIN ES-TATES FILING NO. 4, COUNTY OFTELLER, STATE OF COLORADO.

which has the address of:163 Bighorn LaneFlorissant, CO 80816

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJanuary 28, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/3/2014Last Publication: 12/31/2014Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/6/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: TORBEN M WELCH AttorneyRegistration #34282MESSNER & REEVES, LLC1430 WYNKOOP STREET, SUITE 300 ,DENVER, COLORADO 80202Phone: (303) 623-1800Fax: (303) 623-2606Attorney file #: 1445.312040260

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0047First Publication: 12/3/2014Last Publication: 12/31/2014Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0048

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 1, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: ANDREW S. BICKINGOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEEFOR LENDER, QUICKEN LOANS INC.Current Holder of Evidence of Debt:PROVIDENT FUNDING ASSOCIATES,L.P.Date of Deed of Trust: 9/16/2006Recording Date of Deed of Trust :10/4/2006Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.598544Original Principal Amount: $128,700.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 1 3 , 8 0 3 . 7 9

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to pay monthly installments dueNote Holder.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 1, BLOCK 1, SPRING VALLEYTHIRD FILING, TELLER COUNTY, COL-ORADO.

which has the address of:178 E Lake DrDivide, CO 80814

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJanuary 28, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/3/2014Last Publication: 12/31/2014Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/6/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: JOLENE KAMINSKIAttorney Registration #46144MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250 , LAKE-WOOD, COLORADO 80228Phone: (303) 274-0155Fax: 1 (303) 274-0159Attorney file #: 14-108-27354

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0048First Publication: 12/3/2014Last Publication: 12/31/2014Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0048

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 1, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: ANDREW S. BICKINGOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEEFOR LENDER, QUICKEN LOANS INC.Current Holder of Evidence of Debt:PROVIDENT FUNDING ASSOCIATES,L.P.Date of Deed of Trust: 9/16/2006Recording Date of Deed of Trust:10/4/2006Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.598544Original Principal Amount: $128,700.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 1 3 , 8 0 3 . 7 9

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to pay monthly installments dueNote Holder.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 1, BLOCK 1, SPRING VALLEYTHIRD FILING, TELLER COUNTY, COL-ORADO.

which has the address of:178 E Lake DrDivide, CO 80814

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJanuary 28, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/3/2014Last Publication: 12/31/2014Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/6/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: JOLENE KAMINSKIAttorney Registration #46144MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250 , LAKE-WOOD, COLORADO 80228Phone: (303) 274-0155Fax: 1 (303) 274-0159Attorney file #: 14-108-27354

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0048First Publication: 12/3/2014Last Publication: 12/31/2014Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0049

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 7, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: JOHN BATOKOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEEFOR LENDER, FREEDOM MORTGAGECORPORATIONCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt: CAR-RINGTON MORTGAGE SERVICES, LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 10/10/2008Recording Date of Deed of Trust:10/20/2008Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.621657Original Principal Amount: $74,520.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 4 6 , 5 3 2 . 7 4

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to pay monthly installments dueNote Holder.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 610, TRANQUIL ACRES, TELLERCOUNTY, COLORADO.

which has the address of:784 Blossom RdWoodland Park, CO 80863-8115

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofFebruary 4, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/10/2014Last Publication: 1/7/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/9/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: JOLENE KAMINSKIAttorney Registration #46144MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250,LAKEWOOD, COLORADO 80228Phone: (303) 274-0155Fax: 1 (303) 274-0159Attorney file #: 14-100-27373

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0049First Publication: 12/10/2014Last Publication: 1/7/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0049

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 7, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: JOHN BATOKOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEEFOR LENDER, FREEDOM MORTGAGECORPORATIONCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt: CAR-RINGTON MORTGAGE SERVICES, LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 10/10/2008Recording Date of Deed of Trust:10/20/2008Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.621657Original Principal Amount: $74,520.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 4 6 , 5 3 2 . 7 4

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to pay monthly installments dueNote Holder.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 610, TRANQUIL ACRES, TELLERCOUNTY, COLORADO.

which has the address of:784 Blossom RdWoodland Park, CO 80863-8115

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofFebruary 4, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/10/2014Last Publication: 1/7/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/9/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: JOLENE KAMINSKIAttorney Registration #46144MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250,LAKEWOOD, COLORADO 80228Phone: (303) 274-0155Fax: 1 (303) 274-0159Attorney file #: 14-100-27373

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0049First Publication: 12/10/2014Last Publication: 1/7/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0049

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 7, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: JOHN BATOKOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEEFOR LENDER, FREEDOM MORTGAGECORPORATIONCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt: CAR-RINGTON MORTGAGE SERVICES, LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 10/10/2008Recording Date of Deed of Trust:10/20/2008Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.621657Original Principal Amount: $74,520.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 4 6 , 5 3 2 . 7 4

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to pay monthly installments dueNote Holder.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 610, TRANQUIL ACRES, TELLERCOUNTY, COLORADO.

which has the address of:784 Blossom RdWoodland Park, CO 80863-8115

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofFebruary 4, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/10/2014Last Publication: 1/7/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/9/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: JOLENE KAMINSKIAttorney Registration #46144MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250,LAKEWOOD, COLORADO 80228Phone: (303) 274-0155Fax: 1 (303) 274-0159Attorney file #: 14-100-27373

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0049First Publication: 12/10/2014Last Publication: 1/7/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0050

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 9, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: KELLEY A SMITHOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICANMORTGAGE NETWORK, INC.Current Holder of Evidence of Debt:GREEN TREE SERVICING LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 6/2/2006Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 6/5/2006Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.594486Original Principal Amount: $110,210.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 9 9 , 0 9 7 . 8 1

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 7 AND 8, BLOCK 33, TOWN OFVICTOR, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATEOF COLORADO

which has the address of:315 South 5th StreetVictor, CO 80860

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofFebruary 11, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/15/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: NICHOLAS H SANTARELLIAttorney Registration #46592JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-003272

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0050First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0050

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 9, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: KELLEY A SMITHOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICANMORTGAGE NETWORK, INC.Current Holder of Evidence of Debt:GREEN TREE SERVICING LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 6/2/2006Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 6/5/2006Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.594486Original Principal Amount: $110,210.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 9 9 , 0 9 7 . 8 1

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 7 AND 8, BLOCK 33, TOWN OFVICTOR, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATEOF COLORADO

which has the address of:315 South 5th StreetVictor, CO 80860

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofFebruary 11, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/15/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: NICHOLAS H SANTARELLIAttorney Registration #46592JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-003272

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0050First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110391

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofMURPHY FAMILY TRUST and the prop-erties are currently assessed and taxed inthe name of MURPHY FAMILY TRUST.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

MURPHY FAMILY TRUSTELMO D MURPHYGERALDINE FIX

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L15 B4 CRYSTAL PEAK EST 1

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto LZ ESTATES, LP, the present holdersand legal owners thereof, who hath maderequest upon the Treasurer of TellerCounty for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 29,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72494First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0051

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 13, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: BRYAN KAHN ANDRHONDA KAHNOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTYWIDEHOME LOANS, INC. DBA AMERICA'SWHOLESALE LENDERCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt:GREEN TREE SERVICING LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 7/30/2007Recording Date of Deed of Trust :8/20/2007Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.609973Original Principal Amount: $203,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 2 1 4 , 0 3 3 . 3 0

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 21 IN FLORISSANT ESTATES,SUBDIVISION NO. 1, COUNTY OFTELLER, STATE OF COLORADO

which has the address of:179 Mesa DrFlorissant, CO 80816

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofFebruary 11, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/15/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHTAttorney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-001815

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0051First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Government Legals

Pikes Peak Courier 1217 - [PDF Document] (31)

Pikes Peak Courier 31 December 17, 2014

31

CITY OF CRIPPLE CREEKCHECK SUMMARY REPORT NOVEMBER 2014

BANK OF THE TREASURER

MEDD DAUMAN $200.00 LEXISNEXIS MATTHEW BENDER $527.54 WAL-MART COMMUNITY $114.86 CROWN TROPHY $211.09 JAMES NOBLE $143.14 MOUNTAIN STATES EMPLOYERS COUNCIL $5,000.00 FASTSIGNS OF COLORADO SPRINGS $710.40 SUNSTATE EQUIPMENT CO $725.38 PAT MARTIN $176.96 PAUL PROBYN $38.50 BLACK HILLS ENERGY $7,162.01 TOTAL OFFICE SOLUTIONS $22.28 CHUCK CALDWELL $84.00 MR POTS, INC $130.00 ROCKLEDGE INC $986.57 CRIPPLE CREEK MOUNTAIN ESTATES $214.50 ROBERT KIBLE $250.00 WAXIE SANITARY SUPPLY $1,153.05 TELLER NETWORKING, INC $5,617.20 ORKIN-COLORADO SPRINGS, CO $50.56 PENROSE ST. FRANCIS HEALTH CARE SYS $7,986.22 TELLER COUNTY WASTE $788.00 FORENSIC TRUTH VERIFICATIONGROUP $140.00 JOHN HARTELT $122.17 SHERRY ROWE $18.01 TED SCHWEITER $106.40 FUN EXPRESS $351.95 JESSICA EDGETT $56.00 JIM BORGIOLI $198.00 PRUTCH’S GARAGE DOOR, CO., INC $72.50 RYAN BOWMAN $400.00 ROBERT KIBLE $198.00 CnR MECHANICAL $303.03 BLAKELY + COMPANY $8,845.97 MCI COMM SERVICE $184.52 EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONSNETWORK $1,500.00 R BUSINESS SYSTEMS, INC. $133.50 PUBLIC AGENCY TRAINING COUNCIL $590.00 FIRE & POLICE SELECTION, INC. $500.00 FIRE & POLICE SELECTION, INC $576.15 STANDARD SALES CAMPANY, LP $100.00 JOEL ORAMAS $85.00

KRISTY BUSS $65.00 ROBERT JONES $100.00 COLORADO DIVISION OF FIRE $90.00 RAMPART SUPPLY $9.49 WATER/SEWER FUND $9,776.44 ACTION 22 $150.00 BJ FETT JR $472.50 SAM’S CLUB $683.96 PITNEY BOWES INC $175.08 QUILL CORPORATION $538.80 VERIZON WIRELESS, BELLEVUE $80.02 XEROX CORPORATION $1,296.51 SAMS CLUB #8272 $248.65 CONNIE BRIGGS $101.40 STEVEN W VEATCH $528.80 CRIPPLE CREEK ACE HARDWARE $538.64 MELISSA BEATY $40.61 COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA $8.60 BANK CARD CENTER $453.42 BANK CARD CENTER $610.96 BANK CARD CENTER $5,168.29 TELLER PARK VETERINARYSERVICES $204.80 CENTRAL UNIFORM & LINEN $136.78 WAKEFIELD & ASSOCIATES $240.89 ORCHARD TRUST COMPANY, LLC $12,826.73 US DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION $177.74 WATER/SEWER FUND $423.72 COLORADO DEPT OF REVENUE $45.32 BANK CARD CENTER $167.26 ADP, INC $628.30 COMMUNITY OF CARING $4,149.36 HOLLAND VENTURES $375.00 NEVE’S UNIFORMS & EQUIPMENT $1,353.40 CHRIS EKSTROM $300.26 123 EAST BENNETT AVENUE, LLC $420.00 GOLD STANDARD CONSTRUCTION $1,875.00 FASTSIGNS OF COLORADO SPRINGS $210.00 INTELLICORP RECORDS, INC $39.80 SKYBEAM $86.68 RYAN FROST $300.00 AMERICAN BUS ASSOCIATION $500.00 BLACK HILLS ENERGY $176.53 THYSSEN KRUPP ELEVATOR $266.37 TOTAL OFFICE SOLUTIONS $169.98 ROCKLEDGE INC $1,414.07 TOUR COLORADO $450.00 WAL-MART $13,600.00 PHYCHOLOGICAL DIMENSIONS $175.00 SAM HEDGES $130.87 NORTHERN SAFETY CO., INC $122.72

JOHN HARTELT $80.91 EXCELL CRIPPLE CREEK, LLC $3,816.50 TRANSITPLUS, INC $2,691.30 ADVANCED ALARM CO $339.30 SHERRY ROWE $28.32 PEAK GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS LTD. $3,000.00 FUN EXPRESS $226.96 DAN WALSH $167.32 DOMINION TECHNOLOGY GROUP, INC $2,697.00 TELLER NETCAST, LLC $100.00 NANCY MANN $20.38 EAGLE EYE CARPET $205.00 CRIPPLE CREEK VENTURE FOODS $54.00 WAXIE SANITARY SUPPLY $638.04 VISIT DENVER, THE CONVENTION $525.00 THE SUPPLY CACHE $50.25 ALERT FIRST AID SERVICE $178.36 HOMETOWN TROLLEY $209,715.00 STEAMATIC OF COLORADO SPRINGS, INC. $1,980.00 CRYSTAL IMAGES, INC $221.00 BATTERY PRODUCTS, INC. $558.92 MAYNARD BUCKLES $345.00 COLORADO TOUR LINE, LLC $960.00 NORTON & SMITH, P.C. $1,165.81 ZOLL MEDICAL CORPORATION GPO $120.00 AMORY PROPERTIES, LLC $1,000.00 MIKE RULO $54.03 COLORADO NATURAL GAS $3,418.28 PETTY CASH - POLICE DEPARTMENT $88.49 COLORADO DIVISION OF FIRE $30.00 WATER/SEWER FUND $770.00 OFFICE DEPOT $103.12 PROFILE EAP $283.62 SAM’S CLUB $318.91 ROI FIRE & BALLISTICS EQUIPMENT, INC. $1,380.00 CENTRAL UNIFORM & LINEN $89.36 BRUNO’S PARTY TIME RENTAL $210.00 BANK CARD CENTER $317.92 COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA $404.40 PRO PROMOTIONS $16,410.73 TWO-MILE HIGH CLUB $5,944.45 HAYES,PHILLIPS,HOFFMANN & CARBERRY $5,883.75 XEROX CORPORATION $414.23 CENTURYLINK $53.52 BANK CARD CENTER $949.40 CENTURYLINK $877.89 VERIZON WIRELESS, BELLEVUE $80.02

VERIZON WIRELESS, BELLEVUE $1,656.88 CINTAS FAS LOCKBOX 636525 $96.00 QUILL CORPORATION $870.27 PITNEY BOWES INC $99.33 DEEP ROCK WATER $112.92 COLO MUNICIPAL LEAGUE $2,339.00 US DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION $197.37 WAKEFIELD & ASSOCIATES $210.28 BANK CARD CENTER $1,861.57 COLORADO DEPT OF REVENUE $45.99 ORCHARD TRUST COMPANY, LLC $13,152.69 BRANDON BLANCHARD $115.69 WAKEFIELD & ASSOCIATES $43.61 LEGALSHIELD $18.95 WATER/SEWER FUND $1,944.50 AFLAC $420.00 ANTHEM BLUE CROSS & BLUE SHIELD $46,960.34 LINCOLN NATIONAL LIFEINSURANCE CO. $2,857.76 AMERICAN FIDELITY INS. CO. $1,386.00 CIRSA $1,873.00 SUN LIFE FINANCIAL $3,334.23 ADP, INC $640.40 $458,080.48

HISTORIC PRESERVATION

PROGESSIVE SERVICES, INC. $21.20 USDA WILDLIFE SERVICES $1,333.50 HISTORIC PRESERVATION $40.22 STANDARD COFFEE SERVICE $74.65 QUILL CORPORATION $20.24 XEROX CORPORATION $39.53 A T & T $867.46 CRIPPLE CREEK ACE HARDWARE $31.97 BANK CARD CENTER $78.37 SKYBEAM $269.84 BLACK HILLS ENERGY $1,213.58 GOLD BELT TOUR $5,000.00 TELLER COUNTY WASTE $122.00 MCKENNEY THERESA M $8,581.00 GOERTZ CHAD $1,140.00 BANK CARD CENTER $3,121.32 ORCHARD TRUST COMPANY, LLC $678.76 ADP, INC $42.35 COLORADO NATURAL GAS $1,101.90 PROFILE EAP $19.56 QUILL CORPORATION $16.17 COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA $59.00 VERIZON WIRELESS, BELLEVUE $53.89

CENTURYLINK $38.56 CENTURYLINK $6.78 XEROX CORPORATION $49.07 WAL-MART $900.00 OLD HOMESTEAD HOUSE MUSEUM $300.00 ADVANCED ALARM CO $250.00 ORCHARD TRUST COMPANY, LLC $678.74 DAVID E. MITCHELL $2,500.00 ANTHEM BLUE CROSS & BLUE SHIELD $1,917.76 LINCOLN NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. $46.88 AMERICAN FIDELITY INS. CO. $41.00 SUN LIFE FINANCIAL $91.80 ADP, INC $36.30 $30,783.40

BANK OF CC WATER/SEWER

PROGRESSIVE SERVICES, INC. $21.20 PRUTCH’S GARAGE DOOR, CO., INC $205.00 KIEWIT INFRASTRUCTURE CO $1,073,224.68 CASI ASPHALT & CONCRETE $1,890.00 PETTY CASH - PUBLIC WORKS DEPT $28.36 JDS-HYDRO CONSULTANTS, INC $2,180.16 SHORT ELLIOTT HENDRICKSON. INC. $550.37 TELLER COUNTY WASTE $240.00 ROSS BETHEL, LLC $300.00 BLACK HILLS ENERGY $12,752.77 DPC INDUSTRIES $1,442.19 ALL TYPE MECHANICAL SERVICES INC $5,356.50 CLASS C SOLUTIONS GROUP $381.43 CRIPPLE CREEK ACE HARDWARE $263.48 DIVIDE ASPHALT, LLC $36,560.00 COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA $66.00 QUILL CORPORATION $328.02 MOUNTAIN STATES PIPE & SUPPLY $490.00 HACH COMPANY $170.52 W.W. GRAINGER, INC. $68.02 FORESTRY SUPPLIERS INC $278.00 INTERSTATE CHEMICAL CO, INC $11,330.00 CENTRAL UNIFORM & LINEN $54.48 XEROX CORPORATION $25.35 REX OIL COMPANY/GRAY OIL COMPANY $9,223.92 ACCUTEST LABORATORIES $360.00 T.C.W. $1,567.41 DISTRICT SUPPLY $1,171.60 ORCHARD TRUST COMPANY, LLC $2,967.28 ADP, INC $66.55 KIEWIT INFRASTRUCTURE CO $19,823.60 DOMINION TECHNOLOGY GROUP, INC $100.00 JDS-HYDRO CONSULTANTS, INC $3,335.00 DIVIDE ASPHALT, LLC $17,674.00

PARSONS BRINKERHOFF, INC $82,024.44 WAL-MART $1,900.00 ROSS BETHEL, LLC $480.00 SKYBEAM $93.72 INTELLICORP RECORDS, INC $19.90 SGS NORTH AMERICA INC $753.35 TOTAL HEALTHCARE INC DBA CCOM COS $64.00 NAPA WOODLAND PARK $1,314.96 XEROX CORPORATION $16.29 CENTURYLINK $276.93 VERIZON WIRELESS, BELLEVUE $346.58 STANDARD COFFEE SERVICE $87.37 T.C.W. $1,831.51 FELT,MONSON & CULICHIA, LLC $3,807.60 DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM RESOURCES, LTD. $1,193.20 CLEAR CHOICE ANTIFREEZE $445.35 W.W. GRAINGER, INC. $41.72 K&K CUSTOM FABRICATION & WELDING, INC. $21,000.00 DISTRICT SUPPLY $24,490.00 COLORADO NATURAL GAS $1,230.22 PARK AND ASSOCIATES, INC. $4,000.00 UNCC $30.60 PROFILE EAP $42.38 REX OIL COMPANY/GRAY OIL COMPANY $388.71 CENTRAL UNIFORM & LINEN $54.48 INTERSTATE CHEMICAL CO, INC $472.48 FORESTRY SUPPLIERS INC $420.29 WAGNER EQUIPMENT CO $3,152.50 TMBC $994.00 ORCHARD TRUST COMPANY, LLC $3,286.24 KIEWIT INFRASTRUCTURE CO $1,324,125.84 LEGALSHIELD $31.90 AFLAC $224.88 ANTHEM BLUE CROSS & BLUE SHIELD $9,151.58 LINCOLN NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. $234.94 AMERICAN FIDELITY INS. CO. $275.00 CIRSA $66.00 SUN LIFE FINANCIAL $629.06 ADP, INC $72.60 $2,693,566.51

Legal Notice No.: 72502First Publication: December 17, 2014Last Publication: December 17, 2014Publisher: Pike Peak Courier View

Public Notice

Public Trustees

Public Notice

NOTICE OF SALE(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0051

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On October 13, 2014, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: BRYAN KAHN ANDRHONDA KAHNOriginal Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTYWIDEHOME LOANS, INC. DBA AMERICA'SWHOLESALE LENDERCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt:GREEN TREE SERVICING LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 7/30/2007Recording Date of Deed of Trust:8/20/2007Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.609973Original Principal Amount: $203,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 2 1 4 , 0 3 3 . 3 0

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 21 IN FLORISSANT ESTATES,SUBDIVISION NO. 1, COUNTY OFTELLER, STATE OF COLORADO

which has the address of:179 Mesa DrFlorissant, CO 80816

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofFebruary 11, 2015, at the Teller CountyPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. BennettAve., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pub-lic auction to the highest and best bidderfor cash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 10/15/2014ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHTAttorney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-001815

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0051First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 1/14/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE TO CREDITORSIn the Matter of the Estate of:

DAVID MALCOLM McCORMICK(AKA DAVID M. McCORMICK),

DeceasedCase Number: 14-PR-30057

All persons having claims against theAbove-named estate are required topresent them to the Personal Represent-ative or to the District Court of TellerCounty, Colorado on or before April 3,2015, or the claims may be forever barred.

Dated this 24th day of November, 2014.

Mary Ann HammPersonal Representativeto the Estate519 West Ridge RoadLittleton, CO 80120Home Phone: 720-851-8357

Legal Notice No.: 72454First Publication: December 3, 2014Last Publication: December 17, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE TO CREDITORSEstate of Drew Douglas Stanley,aka Drew D. Stanley, Deceased

Case Number: 2014 PR 12 (Teller)

All persons having claims against theabove-named estate are required topresent them to the Personal Represent-ative or to the District Court of TellerCounty, Colorado on or before April 3,2015 or the claims may be forever barred.

David M. StanleyPersonal RepresentativeP.O. Box 114Isle Lamotte, VT 05463

Legal Notice No: 72453First Publication: December 3, 2014Last Publication: December 17, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Misc. Private Legals PUBLIC NOTICE

DISTRICT COURT, TELLER COUNTY,COLORADO

101 West Bennett AvenueCripple Creek CO 80813

(719) 689-2543

Plaintiff(s): OCK LLC d/b/a/ OCK LLC401k PLAN FBO KEVIN POOL,a Colorado limited liability company

Defendant(s): DONALD J. HOTAVIS;KATE M. HOTAVIS; and all unknown per-sons who claim any interest in the subjectmatter of this action

Attorney for Plaintiff:Noah Klug, Atty No. 39163

THE KLUG LAW FIRM, LLCPO Box 6683Breckenridge CO 80424-6683Telephone: [emailprotected]

Case Number: 2014CV30119 * Div. 11

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION

THE PEOPLE OF THESTATE OF COLORADOTO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS

You are hereby summoned and requiredto appear and defend against the claimsof the Complaint filed with the Clerk of thisCourt an Answer or other response. Youare required to file your answer or otherresponse within 35 days after the serviceof this summons upon you. Service of thissummons shall be complete on the day ofthe last publication. A copy of the Com-plaint may be obtained from the Clerk ofthe Court.

If you fail to file your Answer or other re-sponse to the Complaint in writing withinthe 35 days after the date of the last pub-lication, judgment by default may berendered against you by the Court for therelief demanded in the Complaint withoutfurther notice.

This is an action involving real propertylocated in the County of Teller, State ofColorado, described as follows:

L13 SPRING VALLEY 5(30) 29.191-4-21 R0013694

(Formerly assessed in the name of Don-ald J. and Kate M. Hotavis)Also known as: 509 Ridge Rd., Divide CO80814, together with all its appurtenances

Date: November 13, 2014/s/ Noah KlugAttorney for Plaintiff

This summons is issued pursuant to Rule4(g), Colorado Rules of Civil Procedure.This form should not be used where per-sonal service is desired.

*Rule 12(a), C.R.C.P., allows 35 days foranswer or response where service of pro-cess is by publication. However, undervarious statutes, a different response timeis set forth: e.g., §38-6-104, C.R.S. (emin-ent domain); §38-36-121, C.R.S. (Torrensregistration)

Legal Notice No.: 72420First Publication: November 26, 2014Last Publication: December 24, 2014Published in the Pikes Peak Courier View

Government Legals Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATE OF

PURCHASE NO. 20110087

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofRUTH BORDEN and the properties arecurrently assessed and taxed in the nameof RUTH BORDEN.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

RUTH BORDENC/O SHIRLEY RENFROW

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L16 B4 WESTWOOD LAKES RESUB

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto INTEGRITY BANK & TRUST FBODAVID L BROWN ROTH IRA, the presentholder and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 22,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 3rd day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72471First date of Publication:December 10, 2014Second date of Publication:December 17, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 24, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATE OF

PURCHASE NO. 20110087

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofRUTH BORDEN and the properties arecurrently assessed and taxed in the nameof RUTH BORDEN.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

RUTH BORDENC/O SHIRLEY RENFROW

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L16 B4 WESTWOOD LAKES RESUB

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto INTEGRITY BANK & TRUST FBODAVID L BROWN ROTH IRA, the presentholder and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 22,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 3rd day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72471First date of Publication:December 10, 2014Second date of Publication:December 17, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 24, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110315

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofWILMA W & TIMOTHY KLINE and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of WILMA W &TIMOTHY KLINE.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

WILMA W & TIMOTHY KLINE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L11 B25 VICTOR

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto BEAR R WOODWARD, the presentholder and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 22,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 3rd day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72472First date of Publication:December 10, 2014Second date of Publication:December 17, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 24, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110124

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofSHILOH PLAIN INC and the propertiesare currently assessed and taxed in thename of SHILOH PLAIN INC.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

SHILOH PLAIN INC

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

28-14-69 PT L26 S OF SECOND MIL-LION MS 15969, E OF ANNIE MAY MS11022, AND NE OF HWY 67 SR

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto SHERRY LEE WEINSTOCK, thepresent holder and legal owner thereof,who hath made request upon the Treas-urer of Teller County for a deed, and thatunless the same be redeemed on or be-fore April 22, 2015, the said County Treas-urer will issue a Treasurer’s deed there-fore to said certificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 3rd day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72473First date of Publication:December 10, 2014Second date of Publication:December 17, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 24, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110124

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofSHILOH PLAIN INC and the propertiesare currently assessed and taxed in thename of SHILOH PLAIN INC.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

SHILOH PLAIN INC

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

28-14-69 PT L26 S OF SECOND MIL-LION MS 15969, E OF ANNIE MAY MS11022, AND NE OF HWY 67 SR

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto SHERRY LEE WEINSTOCK, thepresent holder and legal owner thereof,who hath made request upon the Treas-urer of Teller County for a deed, and thatunless the same be redeemed on or be-fore April 22, 2015, the said County Treas-urer will issue a Treasurer’s deed there-fore to said certificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 3rd day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72473First date of Publication:December 10, 2014Second date of Publication:December 17, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 24, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATE OF

PURCHASE NO. 20110496

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofWm DENNIS RUPP and the propertiesare currently assessed and taxed in thename of Wm DENNIS RUPP.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

Wm DENNIS RUPP

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L23 B1 ARABIAN ACRES 2

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto ELLIE M HURLEY, the present holderand legal owner thereof, who hath maderequest upon the Treasurer of TellerCounty for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 22,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 3rd day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72474First date of Publication:December 10, 2014Second date of Publication:December 17, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 24, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110131

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofSTEVEN D & VICTORIA L CAMPBELLand the properties are currently assessedand taxed in the name of STEVEN D &VICTORIA L CAMPBELL.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

STEVEN D & VICTORIA L CAMPBELLCOLORADO MOUNTAIN ESTATES -POA

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L1600 COLO MTN EST 11

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto ONDRAKS, LLC, the present holderand legal owner thereof, who hath maderequest upon the Treasurer of TellerCounty for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 22,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 3rd day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72475First date of Publication:December 10, 2014Second date of Publication:December 17, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 24, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110131

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofSTEVEN D & VICTORIA L CAMPBELLand the properties are currently assessedand taxed in the name of STEVEN D &VICTORIA L CAMPBELL.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

STEVEN D & VICTORIA L CAMPBELLCOLORADO MOUNTAIN ESTATES -POA

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L1600 COLO MTN EST 11

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto ONDRAKS, LLC, the present holderand legal owner thereof, who hath maderequest upon the Treasurer of TellerCounty for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 22,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 3rd day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72475First date of Publication:December 10, 2014Second date of Publication:December 17, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 24, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110542

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofSTOCKBRIDGE PROPERTIES LLC andthe properties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of STOCKBRIDGEPROPERTIES LLC.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

STOCKBRIDGE PROPERTIES LLC

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L33 B6 ORIOLE ADD

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto ELLIE M HURLEY, the present holderand legal owner thereof, who hath maderequest upon the Treasurer of TellerCounty for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 22,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 3rd day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72476First date of Publication:December 10, 2014Second date of Publication:December 17, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 24, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110261

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofAAREF AHMED HEJRES and the proper-ties are currently assessed and taxed inthe name of AAREF AHMED HEJRES.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

AAREF AHMED HEJRESCRIPPLE CREEK MOUNTAINESTATES - POA

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L15 CCME 6

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto CHARLES A LONG, the present holderand legal owner thereof, who hath maderequest upon the Treasurer of TellerCounty for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 22,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 3rd day of December, A.D.2014.

Legal Notice No.: 72477First date of Publication:December 10, 2014Second date of Publication:December 17, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 24, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110544

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofSTOCKBRIDGE PROPERTIES LLC andthe properties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of STOCKBRIDGEPROPERTIES LLC.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

STOCKBRIDGE PROPERTIES LLC

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L37 & 38 B4 CR CK CAP HILL

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto ELLIE M HURLEY, the present holderand legal owner thereof, who hath maderequest upon the Treasurer of TellerCounty for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 22,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 3rd day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72478First date of Publication:December 10, 2014Second date of Publication:December 17, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 24, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110544

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofSTOCKBRIDGE PROPERTIES LLC andthe properties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of STOCKBRIDGEPROPERTIES LLC.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

STOCKBRIDGE PROPERTIES LLC

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L37 & 38 B4 CR CK CAP HILL

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto ELLIE M HURLEY, the present holderand legal owner thereof, who hath maderequest upon the Treasurer of TellerCounty for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 22,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 3rd day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72478First date of Publication:December 10, 2014Second date of Publication:December 17, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 24, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110066

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofHECTOR BALCACER and the propertiesare currently assessed and taxed in thename of HECTOR BALCACER.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

HECTOR BALCACERLITCHFIELD FINANCIAL CORPC/O TEXTRON

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L11 & 12 B2 MONTROSE ADD

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto TOMMY F YOWELL & DAVID AFENOGLIO, the present holders and leg-al owners thereof, who hath made re-quest upon the Treasurer of Teller Countyfor a deed, and that unless the same beredeemed on or before April 29, 2015, thesaid County Treasurer will issue a Treas-urer’s deed therefore to said certificateholder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72491First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110080

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofALEXANDER R BECERRA JR and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of JACK D ENGLAND,DOPC.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

JACK D ENGLAND, DOPCCRIPPLE CREEK MOUNTAINESTATES – POAMOUNTAIN MUTUAL WATER CO

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L12 CCME 8

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto TOMMY F YOWELL & DAVID AFENOGLIO, the present holders and leg-al owners thereof, who hath made re-quest upon the Treasurer of Teller Countyfor a deed, and that unless the same beredeemed on or before April 29, 2015, thesaid County Treasurer will issue a Treas-urer’s deed therefore to said certificateholder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72492First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Pikes Peak Courier 1217 - [PDF Document] (32)

32 Pikes Peak Courier December 17, 2014

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Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110080

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofALEXANDER R BECERRA JR and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of JACK D ENGLAND,DOPC.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

JACK D ENGLAND, DOPCCRIPPLE CREEK MOUNTAINESTATES – POAMOUNTAIN MUTUAL WATER CO

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L12 CCME 8

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto TOMMY F YOWELL & DAVID AFENOGLIO, the present holders and leg-al owners thereof, who hath made re-quest upon the Treasurer of Teller Countyfor a deed, and that unless the same beredeemed on or before April 29, 2015, thesaid County Treasurer will issue a Treas-urer’s deed therefore to said certificateholder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72492First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110390

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofMURPHY FAMILY TRUST and the prop-erties are currently assessed and taxed inthe name of MURPHY FAMILY TRUST.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

MURPHY FAMILY TRUSTELMO D MURPHYGERALDINE FIX

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L14 B4 CRYSTAL PEAK EST 1

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto ONDRAKS, LLC, the present holdersand legal owners thereof, who hath maderequest upon the Treasurer of TellerCounty for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 29,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72493First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110390

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofMURPHY FAMILY TRUST and the prop-erties are currently assessed and taxed inthe name of MURPHY FAMILY TRUST.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

MURPHY FAMILY TRUSTELMO D MURPHYGERALDINE FIX

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L14 B4 CRYSTAL PEAK EST 1

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto ONDRAKS, LLC, the present holdersand legal owners thereof, who hath maderequest upon the Treasurer of TellerCounty for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 29,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72493First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110091

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofBOTTOM LINE RESULTS INC and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of BOTTOM LINE RES-ULTS INC.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

BOTTOM LINE RESULTS INCPARK STATE BANK & TRUSTTRI-STATE INVESTMENTSEQUITY TRUST CO CUSTODIANFBO BYRON M SUMMERS IRAEQUITY TRUST CO CUSTODIAN FBO JOHN POLLAK IRAEQUITY TRUST CO CUSTODIANFBO DANNA SEALE IRAJOHN C & SHARON J SLEEPERC/O ALAN F BARTON

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L2 B12 SHERWOODFOREST EST 3

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto THOMAS & RHONDA HANSCH, thepresent holders and legal owners thereof,who hath made request upon the Treas-urer of Teller County for a deed, and thatunless the same be redeemed on or be-fore April 29, 2015, the said County Treas-urer will issue a Treasurer’s deed there-fore to said certificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72495First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110392

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofMURPHY FAMILY TRUST and the prop-erties are currently assessed and taxed inthe name of MURPHY FAMILY TRUST.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

MURPHY FAMILY TRUSTELMO D MURPHYGERALDINE FIX

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L16 B4 CRYSTAL PEAK EST 1

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto LZ ESTATES LP, the present holdersand legal owners thereof, who hath maderequest upon the Treasurer of TellerCounty for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before April 29,2015, the said County Treasurer will is-sue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to saidcertificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72496First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110094

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofRALPH S & LUCILLE A BRANDT and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of RALPH S &LUCILLE A BRANDT.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

RALPH S & LUCILLE A BRANDTDAVID P & NANCY BRANDTPARK STATE BANK & TRUSTCOLORADO DEPARTMENTOF REVENUE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L1-3 B20 VICT

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto THOMAS & RHONDA HANSCH, thepresent holders and legal owners thereof,who hath made request upon the Treas-urer of Teller County for a deed, and thatunless the same be redeemed on or be-fore April 29, 2015, the said County Treas-urer will issue a Treasurer’s deed there-fore to said certificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72497First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110094

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofRALPH S & LUCILLE A BRANDT and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of RALPH S &LUCILLE A BRANDT.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

RALPH S & LUCILLE A BRANDTDAVID P & NANCY BRANDTPARK STATE BANK & TRUSTCOLORADO DEPARTMENTOF REVENUE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L1-3 B20 VICT

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto THOMAS & RHONDA HANSCH, thepresent holders and legal owners thereof,who hath made request upon the Treas-urer of Teller County for a deed, and thatunless the same be redeemed on or be-fore April 29, 2015, the said County Treas-urer will issue a Treasurer’s deed there-fore to said certificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72497First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO 20110411

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofGEORGE & LULU ODONGO and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of GEORGE & LULUODONGO.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxes, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

GEORGE & LULU ODONGOGHD LAND ACQUISITION LLC

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L10-11 B11 CR CK 1ST ADD

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto BRIAN K & AMY EMERSON, who onNovember 15, 2014 assigned said Certi-ficate of Purchase to BRIAN K EMER-SON, the present holder and legal ownerthereof, who hath made request upon theTreasurer of Teller County for a deed, andthat unless the same be redeemed on orbefore April 29, 2015, the said CountyTreasurer will issue a Treasurer’s Deedtherefore to said certificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December,2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72498First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO 20110411

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofGEORGE & LULU ODONGO and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of GEORGE & LULUODONGO.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxes, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

GEORGE & LULU ODONGOGHD LAND ACQUISITION LLC

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L10-11 B11 CR CK 1ST ADD

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto BRIAN K & AMY EMERSON, who onNovember 15, 2014 assigned said Certi-ficate of Purchase to BRIAN K EMER-SON, the present holder and legal ownerthereof, who hath made request upon theTreasurer of Teller County for a deed, andthat unless the same be redeemed on orbefore April 29, 2015, the said CountyTreasurer will issue a Treasurer’s Deedtherefore to said certificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December,2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72498First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110100

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofSAM BROWN and the properties are cur-rently assessed and taxed in the name ofSAM BROWN.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

SAM BROWNPARK STATE BANK & TRUSTSANDRA E SCOTT

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

W25FT OF E50FT L17-19 B12 VICT

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto THOMAS & RHONDA HANSCH, thepresent holders and legal owners thereof,who hath made request upon the Treas-urer of Teller County for a deed, and thatunless the same be redeemed on or be-fore April 29, 2015, the said County Treas-urer will issue a Treasurer’s deed there-fore to said certificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72499First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110286

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofJAMES H SR & MARY R HURTT and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of JAMES H SR &MARY R HURTT.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

JAMES H SR & MARY R HURTTWARNER NELSONCRIPPLE CREEK MOUNTAIN ESTATES– POAMOUNTAIN MUTUAL WATER CO

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L42 CCME 19-2

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto TOMMY F YOWELL & DAVID AFENOGLIO, the present holders and leg-al owners thereof, who hath made re-quest upon the Treasurer of Teller Countyfor a deed, and that unless the same beredeemed on or before April 29, 2015, thesaid County Treasurer will issue a Treas-urer’s deed therefore to said certificateholder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72500First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATEOF PURCHASE NO. 20110286

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofJAMES H SR & MARY R HURTT and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of JAMES H SR &MARY R HURTT.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

JAMES H SR & MARY R HURTTWARNER NELSONCRIPPLE CREEK MOUNTAIN ESTATES– POAMOUNTAIN MUTUAL WATER CO

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L42 CCME 19-2

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto TOMMY F YOWELL & DAVID AFENOGLIO, the present holders and leg-al owners thereof, who hath made re-quest upon the Treasurer of Teller Countyfor a deed, and that unless the same beredeemed on or before April 29, 2015, thesaid County Treasurer will issue a Treas-urer’s deed therefore to said certificateholder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 10th day of December, A.D.2014.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72500First date of Publication:December 17, 2014Second date of Publication:December 24, 2014Third and last date of Publication:December 31, 2014Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

City of Cripple CreekAGENDA – DECEMBER 17, 2014

4:30 P. M.WORK SESSION –DISCUSSION –PARKING ON BENNETT AVENUE;

Regular Meeting - 5:30 PMLocation: Cripple CreekCity Council Chambers337 Bennett Avenue,Cripple Creek, Colorado 80813

CALL TO ORDERINVOCATIONPLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCEROLL CALLAPPROVAL OF MINUTES FROM PRI-OR MEETINGPUBLIC COMMENTADMINISTRATOR REPORTFINANCE DIRECTOR REPORT

1) PIONEERS IN PUBLIC SERVICECOMMUNITY ALLOCATIONS GRANTRECOMMENDATIONS; STUDENTS2) 1ST READING OF ORDINANCE 2014-10 A BILL FOR AN ORDINANCEAMENDING THE TEXT OF THE CITY OFCRIPPLE CREEK DEVELOPMENTCODE RELATING TO STORAGESTRUCTURES IN RESIDENTIAL ZONEDISTRICTS; LEE PHILLIPS3) RENEWAL OF THE CONTRACTBETWEEN THE CITY OF CRIPPLECREEK AND THIN AIR THEATER COM-PANY, AND THE GOLD CAMP ARTSFOUNDATION FOR THE 2015 SEASONAT THE BUTTE THEATER; PAUL HAR-RIS4) AGREEMENT FOR LEASE OF WA-TER (CRIPPLE CREEK AND CC&V);RAY DuBOIS

EXECUTIVE SESSION; “TO DETERM-INE POSITIONS RELATIVE TO MAT-TERS THAT MAY BE SUBJECT TO NE-GOTIATIONS DEVELOP A STRATEGYFOR NEGOTIATIONS, AND/OR IN-STRUCT NEGOTIATORS, PURSUANTTO C.R.S. § 24-6-402 (4)(e).”

Legal Notice No.: 72510First Publication: 12/17/2014Last Publication: 12/17/2014Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

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Pikes Peak Courier 1217 - [PDF Document] (2024)

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